3 Replies - 6107 Views - Last Post: 29 December 2012 - 01:38 PM

#1 lilVaratep  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Head
  • member icon

Reputation: 22
  • View blog
  • Posts: 215
  • Joined: 09-October 11

Senior Design Project: Computer Networks and Security

Posted 26 September 2012 - 10:21 AM

I'm still a sophomore at my college and I was very interested in the Computer Networks and Security as my senior project area. I was wondering how I could possibly begin to start learning about this sort of stuff?

Here's the classes I'll be needing for comp networks and security: http://www.csun.edu/...cs/packages.pdf


I've also began watching a course of Computer Networks on cosmolearning.
Other than beginning to learn Unix (installed FreeBSD in a virtual machine to begin getting acquainted), what other things should I be doing to prepare myself so that once the time comes, I'll hopefully be prepared to take on any challenges?

Also, if I'm somehow in the wrong section or if there is a better-suited section for this, please inform me!

Thanks in advance.

Is This A Good Question/Topic? 0
  • +

Replies To: Senior Design Project: Computer Networks and Security

#2 Gorian  Icon User is offline

  • ninja DIC
  • member icon

Reputation: 120
  • View blog
  • Posts: 1,681
  • Joined: 28-June 08

Re: Senior Design Project: Computer Networks and Security

Posted 29 December 2012 - 12:06 AM

Hey lilVaratep, you are in the correct section. :)

Depending on your familiarity with networking, and computers, I'd suggest you should start by becoming acquainted with the terms and ideas behind networking. This will give you solid foundation to start learning more complex topics and ideas.



on the OS side of things, setting up a Virtual Machine to learn Linux/BSD is a good idea. I'd suggest find a simple internet service, maybe DNS, DHCP, a web server, and install the OS, the service, and configure them and make them run. From the command line. It may seem hard at first, if you've never done it (apologies if are more experience that my reply assumes, but you didn't really say, so I going with basics :) )
If you run into any problems, we are always willing to help in the forums, and it gives you good hands on experience with a couple different areas.

a few more links you may find useful:

This post has been edited by Gorian: 29 December 2012 - 12:07 AM

Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#3 lilVaratep  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Head
  • member icon

Reputation: 22
  • View blog
  • Posts: 215
  • Joined: 09-October 11

Re: Senior Design Project: Computer Networks and Security

Posted 29 December 2012 - 10:38 AM

Hey, I've totally been off-track on trying to learn network security, as I was busy with finals and building a new computer =D. But now that that's done with and I'm on winter break, will definitely be giving this a shot - thanks! Do you recommend any physical books? I always do better when I'm reading and studying out of a physical book. Which linux distro do you recommend for network education purposes? Will definitely give a go at the Linux Network Administration book as well as the other think.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#4 blackcompe  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Lover
  • member icon

Reputation: 1155
  • View blog
  • Posts: 2,536
  • Joined: 05-May 05

Re: Senior Design Project: Computer Networks and Security

Posted 29 December 2012 - 01:38 PM

I recommend Kurose and Ross's Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach. It covers most of what you'd get in a undergraduate networking course. It's coverage of OSI is very thorough. There are many programming examples, which are nice if you're taking a programming-based course.

Tanenbaum's Computer Networks comes highly recommended, but I've never read it. Both of these books are mostly theoretical.

I often see TCP Illustrated and Unix Network Programming on the list of recommended reference manuals for networking courses. I think they're more practical and geared toward writing code.

For Security, there's Kaufman's Network Security: Private Communication in a Public World. It's excellent (authoritative in fact) as far as detail is concerned and what's covered, but it's certainly not light reading. I'd say it's on the level of Cormen's Algorithms. The first third covers hashing and cryptographic algorithms (AES, DES, RSA, etc.), and the second third covers security protocols (IPSec, SSL, Kerberos, etc.). If you want a gentle introduction to Security, I'd consider reviewing a few other security books before settling upon this one.
Was This Post Helpful? 1
  • +
  • -

Page 1 of 1