how long did it take for programming to click& how did you get int

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26 Replies - 3241 Views - Last Post: 06 November 2012 - 02:35 PM

#16 Ticon  Icon User is offline

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Re: how long did it take for programming to click& how did you get int

Posted 13 October 2012 - 10:15 PM

Spoiler


Its nice to know that.

Just saying
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#17 Choscura  Icon User is offline

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Re: how long did it take for programming to click& how did you get int

Posted 14 October 2012 - 06:58 AM

Nothing clicks until you've busted ass. All my 'clicks' have been a combination of actually understanding something fully and dealing with the fact that I will continue having to bust ass despite understanding, no matter how I feel about it, because fuck my free time.
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#18 marty617  Icon User is offline

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Re: how long did it take for programming to click& how did you get int

Posted 14 October 2012 - 10:33 AM

Over 30 years ago I found an apple ][ manual in junior high. It had assembly language and a schematic in it. I was hooked. I am now going on 24 years getting money programming and you never stop having things "click". If you don't feel like it is "clicking" yet you probably just need more experience with the language you are using so that it is like breathing and your thoughts are more concept than syntax and grammar.
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#19 lar3ry  Icon User is offline

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Re: how long did it take for programming to click& how did you get int

Posted 24 October 2012 - 11:58 PM

1966. Just got out of the RCAF (Royal Canadian Air Force). Got a job with IBM, in the Don Mills plant in Toronto, working on the final test line for the IBM 6400 Electronic Accounting Machine. It wasn't long before I decided to try my hand at programming it instead of just running the diagnostics and fixing problems.

My first program looked for prime numbers. I used a brute force algorithm, testing every odd number by dividing all odd numbers between 3 and half the test number. I started it running at quitting time, and the next morning, after about 15 hours, it had managed to get all the way up to 853. Of course, it was a little primitive... relays for program stepping, plugboard to run a 48Volt shot from program step hubs to operation, word1, and word2 hubs. The actual electronics were done with discrete transistors on SMS (Standard Modular System I think) cards. As an example, a multiply of two 36 bit words took about 1/3 of a second.

From there I went on to 360 assembler, Fortran, then various micro's assemblers, Pet Basic, and so on, all the way to Vb.Net, which I now do for fun, just as I started out doing it for fun. I didn't start programming for a living until about 1996.

But it depends on what you mean by "clicked".

I figure every language I ended up liking, 'clicked' within a few minutes. I either 'got it' or I didn't. The ones I didn't, I never learned more about. These would include Lisp, Cobol, Forth, and many more. The ones I liked were virtually all assemblers except PIC (hate that micrO). I really liked BASIC, VB and VB.Net especially, C, Comal, Rexx, Java, various shell scripting languages, Pilot, Logo, and many more.

As for what I got good in, I consider getting good at a language to be well beyond the 'click'. The 'click' just gives me incentive to learn it (sometimes to learn it well) and to write stuff in it.

Oh, and that prime number thing, in VB.Net, using the same algorithm, finds all the prime numbers up to 99991 in about 3 seconds.
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#20 Aphex19  Icon User is offline

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Re: how long did it take for programming to click& how did you get int

Posted 25 October 2012 - 07:29 AM

I first started with Ruby, which was probably about 5 years ago. It wasn't long before I started learning other languages like C++, C and Assembly (which expanded to learning about multiple architectures, I'm proud to say). With regard to C++, I think that my first learning resource was a book called "Learn to Program with C++: John Smiley", which in hindsight I don't recommend. I find that, looking back, the explanations are overly complex and somewhat redundant. Also, the compiler encouraged is very much out of date. Anyway, more to the point, after I read that book I think that C++ had clicked pretty well with me, and I felt reasonably confident. However, I was still very much a beginner even though I didn't realise it (see *), and it took a few years of practice in coding to actually become a decent programmer. In fact, I have some posts on here that make me kind of face-palm when I look back on them, but the way I overcame these problems was to listen to advice given by others, especially on DIC, and humble myself.

*ignorance more often begets confidence than it does knowledge.
- Charles Darwin
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#21 Curtis Rutland  Icon User is online

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Re: how long did it take for programming to click& how did you get int

Posted 25 October 2012 - 12:52 PM

Honestly, it didn't "click" for me until I already had a job. Textbook examples were OK, I understood some concepts. But until I had a real reason to put them into practice, I didn't know them, I just remembered them.

My current job is really where most things have clicked for me, because I've had the opportunity to work with a lot of people who know more than me. For instance, lambdas. I had been using them when I needed without really understanding what they were or what I was doing. My boss explained them from the perspective of methods, and I kinda understood. Then I had to do a task that required a non-trivial one, and by trying to make it work, I understood how it worked.

I guess that's my biggest piece of advice: find something non-trivial to work on, and work on it. Something that isn't a contrived school example; something you need or want. Something that's just outside your comfort range, that's going to require you to learn a lot to do it.

And you'll look back at your code a year after you wrote it, and say "my god, that's awful. What the hell was I thinking!" And you might rewrite it, and learn even more!
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#22 Choscura  Icon User is offline

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Re: how long did it take for programming to click& how did you get int

Posted 27 October 2012 - 06:47 AM

It never gets easier. You just get faster.


-Patrick Collison. Founder, Stripe
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#23 marty617  Icon User is offline

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Re: how long did it take for programming to click& how did you get int

Posted 27 October 2012 - 10:42 AM

View PostChoscura, on 27 October 2012 - 06:47 AM, said:

It never gets easier. You just get faster.


-Patrick Collison. Founder, Stripe


true that
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#24 jh1997sa  Icon User is offline

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Re: how long did it take for programming to click& how did you get int

Posted 27 October 2012 - 11:32 AM

Since as long as I can remember, I've always been interested in computers, and especially creating my own programs for them. I first got into C++, and was like, I don't know what the hell I'm doing. So I moved onto Python, and found that much easier to understand. For some reason though, I never really LOVED python, so I thought, why not give Java a shot. Now I've fallen in love with Java and spend 95% of my time practicing it.

The thing that keeps me motivated is the thought of making my own Android apps and then possibly making money from them.
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#25 MixedUpCody  Icon User is offline

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Re: how long did it take for programming to click& how did you get int

Posted 28 October 2012 - 05:34 PM

I'll echo what other people have said: there really hasn't been a clicking moment for me. I've been programming for about a year now and I always learn new things, and I imagine I always will. I think the closest you get to an "aha" moment is when you review your old code and you realize how much you've grown, but the important thing to remember is that a year from now you will have grown, too. It never stops.

I will say that reading a few good programming books is necessary, although not sufficient. Books are great at giving you knowledge that it is easy to gloss over otherwise, and their problem sets make you do things you might not do on your own. However, as I've said, books will never really be sufficient. You really need to work at it all the time and always try to be better than you were the day before.

Cody
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#26 gabehabe  Icon User is offline

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Re: how long did it take for programming to click& how did you get int

Posted 05 November 2012 - 05:06 PM

Didn't plan to type anywhere near this much. Also, writing this has made me feel old.

Life of 68172 in a nutshell:

8 years old:
10 PRINT "HELLO"
20 GOTO 10

13(ish): Friend gave me an HTML book, loved that I could make stuff.
16: Same friend introduced me to C++ and I took it up.. learned the basics, but then lost interest (read: got a PS3)
17: Started a game design course, local college sucks so dropped out and taught myself. Learned C++ properly, locked myself away for a year and studied for about 5 hours a night every night.
18: Landed a job working with shitty Foxpro.
19: If I were to say it clicked, this is around the time. Boss realised I knew what I was doing and gave me freedom to set up a Linux server and rewrite a few ASP products to PHP as a learning exercise.
20: Wrote a massive e-commerce site (solo project, biggest project I've worked on to date)
21: Started freelancing. Convinced my boss that Foxpro is outdated and to let me rewrite the company's main product from scratch in C#

View Postdevonrevenge, on 09 October 2012 - 11:46 AM, said:

and if you were self taught what made you keep going until you were any use

Passion. It didn't take me long to realise this is what I wanted to do.


View PostSergio Tapia, on 09 October 2012 - 01:35 PM, said:


dat ui.
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#27 Sergio Tapia  Icon User is offline

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Re: how long did it take for programming to click& how did you get int

Posted 06 November 2012 - 02:35 PM

rounded corners were the shit! :lol:

edit: But goes to show that even in 2009, I could take what little I learned in 9 months of university and start applying it to my personal ideas. I guess I am cut out for this.

This post has been edited by Sergio Tapia: 06 November 2012 - 02:36 PM

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