4 Replies - 1853 Views - Last Post: 17 October 2012 - 05:49 PM

#1 exitsign  Icon User is offline

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BA or BS

Posted 11 October 2012 - 09:19 PM

I know this question has probably been asked hundreds of times, but my circumstance is slightly different. Right now I'm working on a BS in CS, and I'm struggling. Not because of the CS classes, but the math and science classes. So I was thinking about switching to the BA program. I already have enough credits to get a minor in math.

So the classes I wouldn't be taking are Physics I, Physics II, Geology, and Discrete Math II. Instead of taking Intro to Probability (STA4442) I'd be taking Intro to Stats (STA2122). And last I wouldn't take 2 CS classes Theory of Computation, and Analysis of Data Structures II. What I would be missing out on in CS is the main reason why I'm hesitant to switch.

I really just can't handle the work load for the BS. How much of a disadvantage would I be in if I decided to switch from BS to BA with a math minor?

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#2 macosxnerd101  Icon User is online

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Re: BA or BS

Posted 11 October 2012 - 09:29 PM

I'm double majoring in Economics. At my college, there are two degrees- a BS and a BA. Both require the same Econ classes, but the BS degree is in the college of business and requires a lot more business classes. The BA offers me flexibility because I just have to take the econ classes, the general eds, and then free hours.

In your case, I'd say go to the BA if you want to get out of the science classes. You can always take the extra math classes or CS theory classes if you want. For Stats, a 4000 level class is a lot more Calculus, while a 2000 level class is more just introductory material and interpretation. I'm not sure what is being covered in Discrete Math II; it can vary based on schools. Regarding the theory classes, I'd say those are important. You should take at least one to round out, in my opinion.
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#3 exitsign  Icon User is offline

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Re: BA or BS

Posted 11 October 2012 - 10:36 PM

Yeah I think I am just going to do the BA. I'm struggling right now with the BS. I'm just not the type of person that can accept something that is inferior in any way. That is what's making this difficult for me.

If it really matters I could stay in school an extra couple semesters and get that BS, but if it doesn't matter then I will just get the BA.

Also, does anyone know anything about getting into grad school with a BA in computer science.. I heard schools don't like it.
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#4 macosxnerd101  Icon User is online

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Re: BA or BS

Posted 12 October 2012 - 05:34 PM

Going to grad school for computer science is more about your CS qualifications and courses than your physics qualifications. Take the BA and just supplement with the CS courses from the BS track.
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#5 NecroWinter  Icon User is offline

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Re: BA or BS

Posted 17 October 2012 - 05:49 PM

I'm in a similar situation. I think I'm going to switch to a b.a this way I don't have to take physics with a lab. my college has science classes 5 days a week so this will free up time for programming related things for me. unfortunately a b.a doesn't include less math at my college. the only difference is lab based science classes
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