5 Replies - 806 Views - Last Post: 13 November 2012 - 05:53 AM

#1 eXplosiv  Icon User is offline

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16bit vs 32bit

Posted 10 November 2012 - 08:14 AM

I have heared that 16 bit coding is outdated but i have seen example codes for kernel,boot loaders in 16bit code only. My question 'Is it possible to code critical programs like OS with just windows API only without intruppts' in a assembler
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Replies To: 16bit vs 32bit

#2 calvinthedestroyer  Icon User is offline

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Re: 16bit vs 32bit

Posted 10 November 2012 - 12:45 PM

I don't understand your question, can you rephrase it?
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#3 GunnerInc  Icon User is offline

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Re: 16bit vs 32bit

Posted 10 November 2012 - 04:12 PM

It sounds like you are interested in writing an OS... They are not that simple, do your research first. Your OS, your rules... if you want to write an 8bit OS, or 16 bit OS, go right ahead. Yes, 16bit DOS code is outdated, and I am going to take a stab and say the last time DOS was widely used was before you were born :-)

Why would you want to write a 16bit OS or regular program??? Do you understand the limitations of a 16bit OS/program? There are tons of limitations and restrictions, memory is a major one. What is the max value of a 16bit number? Now, what is the max value of a 32bit/64 bit number? You have more address space, with 32/64 bit.

Why should an OS writer support old outdated technology with their newer OS's?

This will be your main source of resources if you are going to write an OS - http://wiki.osdev.or...anded_Main_Page

If you are going to write your own OS, you don't use the windows API, you create your own API so programs can interact with the OS, hardware, memory etc...

There are a few open source OS's written in Assembly. Do a search. Be warned... as there isn't much hand holding in the Assembly community, there is far less when writing an OS. It is assumed that YOU have done your research on interacting with Hardware, memory, different drives, video etc...

To answer your question... we don't write modern apps with interrupts on Windows (unless you are RING 0/1), on Linux we can and do.
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#4 eXplosiv  Icon User is offline

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Re: 16bit vs 32bit

Posted 10 November 2012 - 11:58 PM

Thanks for the link and now i realised how difficult it is .
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#5 GunnerInc  Icon User is offline

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Re: 16bit vs 32bit

Posted 11 November 2012 - 10:18 AM

I am not saying don't learn how to do it, nor am I saying don't write an OS. Writing an OS will put you in an elite group of a handful of people. You will become one with the silicon. Do you use the MS specification for your exes, the elf format, or create and use your own? There so much that goes on behind the scenes when you load and run a program, and during the life of the program that the OS does that almost everyone takes for granted. When I say a program, I am also talking about drivers, dlls, and whatnot.

By all means, go for it!!! Do not expect it to take a month though, it will take some time to get everything right.
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#6 Hooker  Icon User is offline

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Re: 16bit vs 32bit

Posted 13 November 2012 - 05:53 AM

If you are going to code an os for fun and with limited knowledge prefer 16 bit atleast you would get interupts to ease work. Try this link might help you. http://mikeos.berlios.de/
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