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#1 ari03  Icon User is offline

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basic information

Posted 17 November 2012 - 03:18 AM


hi everyone
i'm new member in this web so i wnna say something
after i searched in this web really i wanna say to all who give help thank you so much guys
,,,,,,,,,,
i study in IT college and im in third year i learned some cod and i make some application by VB

but my problem is that i don't know the basic of those code
beginning understand of VB functions.
so what i should do?
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#2 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: basic information

Posted 17 November 2012 - 08:41 AM

1 - Learn the difference between VB6 and VB.NET. I seriously doubt that you're learning VB6 as it is mostly dead and only used for legacy applications.
Please read: This is not the VB.NET forum
Please read: Is learning VB6 now a complete waste of time? (Yes)

2 - Buy a "Learn VB.NET in 30 days" type book and work it cover to cover.

3 - Be honest with your teacher. The fact that you're in your third year and bluffed your way this far yet admit to strangers that you don't even know the basics is terrible. Why would you short-change your own education like that? If you don't tell your teacher that you don't know the basics then how can they help you. The goal of education is to LEARN, not fool to teacher into giving you passing grades.

4 - Make an effort to learn this. There's thousands of tutorials on the internet. Employ some self discipline and work through them instead of watching hours of TV or going partying.
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#3 BobRodes  Icon User is offline

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Re: basic information

Posted 17 November 2012 - 08:59 AM

arl03, I agree entirely with what tlhIn says. tlhIn, since you are the most thoroughgoing apologist on the forum for the affirmative side of the question of whether it is useless to learn VB, I'd like to invite you to detail your views on the thread.
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#4 ari03  Icon User is offline

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Re: basic information

Posted 22 November 2012 - 01:24 AM

thank you both for this honest outright answer ,,,,,

but there is something i should tell you guys
in our country IT is new for us so we haven't good experience with it and in here at yet its not specified exactly what you will learn so sometime our lesson changing we had study (C++,matlab,SQl,oop,prolog,visual basic,,,,) ,, that is why i have this problem ,,,
and i asked my teacher he said in here we will learn some program that we will need it !!! it was like we couldn't be programer and i should admit that he disappointed me about this,,,,
but he also said if you wanna be programer learn yourself "C#",,,,
so is late for me to start?
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#5 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: basic information

Posted 22 November 2012 - 09:06 AM

View Postari03, on 22 November 2012 - 02:24 AM, said:

thank you both for this honest outright answer ,,,,,
he also said if you wanna be programer learn yourself "C#",,,,
so is late for me to start?


Is it too late to learn C#? No. Of course not. And I agree that C# is a good modern language that you can earn a living with.


My standard beginner resources post


We have a tutorials section and a learning C# series of articles.

First learn the language by working 2-5 "Learn C# in 30 days" type books cover to cover. Do a couple hundred on-line tutorial projects where you build what you're told to build, the way you are told to build it WITH AN EXPLANATION OF WHY so you can learn.

There are three routes people seem to take when learning programming.
  • Just start trying to create programs
  • Start taking apart other programs and try to figure out the language by reverse engineering
  • Follow a guided learning course (school or self-teaching books)


For the life of me I can't figure out why people try 1 & 2. I strongly suggest taking the guided learning approach. Those book authors go in a certain order for a reason: They know what they're doing and they know the best order to learn the materials.

Quote

Where do I start?


You start by learning a coding language FIRST.
Learn to plan before you type.
THEN you start designing software with a purpose.


If this sounds like you

Newbie/Rookie said:

I have a little programming experience but I need to write ...
read this section
Spoiler


Otherwise, you can just jump to the resources here:
Some of the tutorials below are for C# or Java not C, C++, VB.NET [...]. But the conceptual stuff of classes, object oriented design, events etc. are not language specific and should give you enough guidance in theory of program development for you to be able to look-up specific code example in your chosen coding language.



Resources, references and suggestions for new programmers. - Updated Oct 2012
Spoiler

This post has been edited by tlhIn`toq: 22 November 2012 - 05:43 PM

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#6 BobRodes  Icon User is offline

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Re: basic information

Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:37 AM

Your page on OO Patterns is an excellent summary, thlin. Also, I agree that a guided learning course is the best way to learn, although I would also recommend the other two approaches along with it. I'm an MCT and Sun Certified Instructor with over 1000 hours of classroom experience, so that may be a prejudice on my part. However, I have generally found that OJT leaves important holes in a person's technical training. The pressure to get things working and delivered militates against taking the time to arrive at best practices, so delivering the best practices in some sort of training environment ("teach yourself" books count as a training environment) generally gives a stronger technical foundation.

This post has been edited by BobRodes: 22 November 2012 - 11:45 AM

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#7 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: basic information

Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:46 AM

Thanks! I hope it helps a few people.

Ooops - Looks like my spoiler tags are mismatched in my resources and help tips. It shouldn't go on and on like that without being collapsed in sections.
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#8 BobRodes  Icon User is offline

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Re: basic information

Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:49 AM

I suspect it will help me! :) My C# experience is mostly maintenance and debugging, so I really do need to follow our advice about self-study. They're throwing me into a C++ maintenance role next, though, so I'll have to find other resources.
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#9 maj3091  Icon User is offline

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Re: basic information

Posted 22 November 2012 - 03:23 PM

Great list of resources tlhIn`toq, some which will be most useful for myself, as well as anyone else who is trying to drag themselves into the world of .Net. Thanks.
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