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#1 Welendowd  Icon User is offline

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Where should I go now?

Posted 22 January 2013 - 09:05 PM

Hello everyone, I am currently attending DeVry University. I have been taking all core classes up until not, meaning most of the classes I have taken have been math, science, history, and writing classes. However, I have taken a few of my Computer Information Systems classes. Beginning next semester I will have nothing but CIS classes til I graduate.

What I am wondering however is where I should go? Meaning what should I learn next, I have taken C++ OOP classes that is the highest programming class I have taken as far. I have been wanting to code a program on my own, I have been reading about aquaponics, and want to code a tool for it. However, the only experience I have had so far is with console window outputs. I am wanting to create a program with GUI instead of just console window. I do not know where to start or what to start learning on my own. The textbook that I used for both my first C++ and C++ oop classes is "Introduction to Programming with C++" So it is only a intro book. We worked through the end of the book in my OOP class.

I want to supplement my learning at DeVry with my own studies at home and my own coding projects. If any of you guys could point me in a direction I would be very grateful.

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Replies To: Where should I go now?

#2 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: Where should I go now?

Posted 23 January 2013 - 08:53 AM

Short answer: There are 100 books on "Learn {language} in 30 days". Most will tech more in one book than an average college course in a year.

Long answer:

My standard beginner resources post - Updated DEC 2012

You can try to learn C# by dismantling snippets and googling terms - basically you can take a hit-n-miss, shotgun approach. Or you could just follow a proper training program whether it be a couple intro books, school, on-line course or series of tutorials like the ones we offer. I'll tell you from experience that just fumbling around in the dark and trying to teach yourself with no guidance doesn't work. Its like stumbling across a Harrier Jump Jet and trying to teach yourself how to fly with no background in piloting: You simply lack any groundwork to start from. How can you lay out your own training course if you don't already know the material? Would you go to a university where the teacher says "I don't know any of this but we'll fumble through it together?"

We have a tutorials section and a learning C# series of articles.

First learn the language by working 2-5 "Learn C# in 30 days" type books cover to cover. Do a couple hundred on-line tutorial projects where you build what you're told to build, the way you are told to build it WITH AN EXPLANATION OF WHY so you can learn.

There are three routes people seem to take when learning programming.
  • Just start trying to create programs
  • Start taking apart other programs and try to figure out the language by reverse engineering
  • Follow a guided learning course (school or self-teaching books)


For the life of me I can't figure out why people try 1 & 2. I strongly suggest taking the guided learning approach. Those book authors go in a certain order for a reason: They know what they're doing and they know the best order to learn the materials.

Quote

Where do I start?


You start by learning a coding language FIRST.
Learn to plan before you type.
THEN you start designing software with a purpose.


If this sounds like you

Newbie/Rookie said:

I have a little programming experience but I need to write ...
read this section
Spoiler


Otherwise, you can just jump to the resources here:
Some of the tutorials below are for C# or Java not C, C++, VB.NET [...]. But the conceptual stuff of classes, object oriented design, events etc. are not language specific and should give you enough guidance in theory of program development for you to be able to look-up specific code example in your chosen coding language.



Resources, references and suggestions for new programmers. - Updated Oct 2012
Spoiler

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#3 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is online

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Re: Where should I go now?

Posted 23 January 2013 - 09:14 AM

View PostWelendowd, on 22 January 2013 - 11:05 PM, said:

I want to supplement my learning at DeVry with my own studies at home and my own coding projects. If any of you guys could point me in a direction I would be very grateful.


Please understand that I'm trying to say this as nicely as I can, but, um, isn't that kind of your job at this point?
You've been in school for your entire life to this point, and one would hope that, if nothing else, this would have given you some idea of what you should pursue next and how to go about it.

The only thing I can really suggest is the advice that I got from my first Java teacher: whatever else you do, you should expect to learn about one language per year, on average, for the rest of your life. Not much more, not much less. If you're really stuck for what to do next, go learn scheme or ML while you're figuring it out.
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#4 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: Where should I go now?

Posted 23 January 2013 - 09:31 AM

That's so much more diplomatic than my answer:

  • You learn what you need to learn, in order to get where you want to go and do what you want to do.
  • If you don't know what you want to learn that says you don't know where you want to go or what you want to do with your life.
  • Therefore, join the Army see the world, learn about life outside of school and maybe learn a bit about who you are and what you want for your future. Then make a decision in 4 years.

This post has been edited by tlhIn`toq: 23 January 2013 - 09:32 AM

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#5 Apokio  Icon User is offline

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Re: Where should I go now?

Posted 23 January 2013 - 12:32 PM

View PosttlhIn`toq, on 23 January 2013 - 10:31 AM, said:

  • Therefore, join the Army see the world, learn about life outside of school and maybe learn a bit about who you are and what you want for your future. Then make a decision in 4 years.


This answer here takes of the what should I do question. The military will tell you what to do, where to go, what to learn, when to sleep. I know several people who got direction taking this same option but it is not for everyone, but a option to consider if you have no direction in life.
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#6 andrewsw  Icon User is online

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Re: Where should I go now?

Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:05 PM

I thought the armed-forces had changed over the last 20, 30+ years, and could no longer be considered the "can't decide" option. That is, because recruitment is dramatically reduced, they want people who see the services as a career.
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#7 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: Where should I go now?

Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:11 PM

We all *want* one thing, and accept the real world in the mean time.
Two decades of war don't help with recruitment. There are great job opportunities in the military. The Navy for example will teach you to be a nuclear power technician if you have the aptitude for it. Or electronics and satellite communication. And if you just need a place to kill 4 years after high school since there are no real jobs at that age, you can always drive a truck or a tank, be a helicopter door gunner, or jump out of perfectly good aircraft. They paid me to learn cryptography. Who else is going to make that investment in a high school graduate?
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