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#1 toad87  Icon User is offline

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Cloud Storage Workspace

Posted 28 January 2013 - 01:05 AM

I'm not sure if I'm posting this in the right area. It does have to do with Java Eclipse.

I've been using a program called Syncdocs Portable to sync my Google Drive folder to a USB flash drive. This way I always have my cloud on me.

Only problem is, I have my Eclipse workspace on my cloud drive. As I go from computer to computer with my flash drive, it seems that the metadata folder is constantly changing and syncing.

I am not exactly too sure why that folder is changing so much when I'm writing code.

And so that's why I am here to ask:

Do you guys see any problems with working like this? It hasn't been a problem...until recently I tried going on my work computer to work on some homework and an error from Eclipse came up saying a certain resource folder in the metadata directory was missing!

The problem was only on that one computer though...

Should I continue with this practice or do you guys foresee more problems for me in the future?

Thanks guys.

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Replies To: Cloud Storage Workspace

#2 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is offline

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Re: Cloud Storage Workspace

Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:23 AM

I'd suggest you set up a source control repository and use that instead. bitbucket.org offers free private git repos, or you can use google code if you don't mind making your code public. Or if you have a suitable location you can set something up on your own server.

A repo offers the portability you're looking for, since you can check out your code to any machine you're working on, but it also keeps your project in a layered backup: you have a sort of time machine for your code. If you're planning on working in software, you're going to want to be comfortable working in at least svn and git, so you might as well start getting used to them now.
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#3 toad87  Icon User is offline

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Re: Cloud Storage Workspace

Posted 28 January 2013 - 07:08 PM

I have no idea what any of those things you're talking about are lol.

But I'll definitely look into. Thanks!
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#4 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is offline

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Re: Cloud Storage Workspace

Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:25 PM

Good answer. Here's a quick overview:
A version-control system is a tool for tracking changes to a project. Typically, a project is represented as a file tree mirroring the file tree on your computer, although it is not actually stored in the repository as a set of literal files. When you "check out" a project from a repo, you download (usually) the most recent version ("head") of the main branch of development, often called the "trunk". You then have the most recent version of the code on your desk. Now you can edit these files, make improvements, and when you have a chunk of work done you can "commit" those changes back to the repository. Now your colleagues can update their work with yours, and you're all working on the same code base, and life's pretty groovy.

There are different systems, and they all have their partisans, who can get very annoying about insisting that their preferred system is the only one worth using. Ignore the holy war and learn subversion (also known as "svn") and git (as in British slang for an irritating person or a fool). Once you have those two, you'll know the most common systems in use today and you'll know enough to figure out any other system you come across.

Subversion is probably easier to get your head around to start with, git is arguably a more powerful tool. Both are infinitely better tools for making your source code portable than any cloud disk space.

Both are free and open source and amply documented, so you should be able to find your way from there.

This post has been edited by jon.kiparsky: 28 January 2013 - 08:28 PM

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