3 Replies - 574 Views - Last Post: 01 April 2013 - 02:02 PM

#1 Zel2008  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Addict

Reputation: 14
  • View blog
  • Posts: 790
  • Joined: 06-January 09

Testing on multiple OS's

Posted 29 March 2013 - 01:14 PM

Hi all,

I have a web application connected to a MySQL database (both of which are given to clients and stored on their own servers). Both of these are served out of an Ubuntu 12.04 virtual machine running through Parallels desktop on a host Mac running Mountain Lion (10.8.2).

I need to test my application on Windows, Mac, and Linux, with browsers IE9, Google Chrome, Firefox, and Safari. I can test with Firefox on my Ubuntu VM, but as of now that's the best I can do.

I have Chrome and Safari on my Mac, but can't set up the server and database correctly to save my life on Mac (fought with it for 8 days before throwing in the towel, and that's why I have the VM). I tried to access the Parallels server from Mac using a few tips I found on the Net, no luck.

And, I haven't even been able to try testing on IE yet.

So, the point of this is, I'm sure there has to be a better way to test than messing with all these configurations. I have no idea how without getting 3 different computers, setting up the server on each one, duplicating all the files, and handling it that way. I've never heard of a Mac (or any computer for that matter) that's strong enough to handle 2 virtual machines.

Does anyone know of a methodology I'm missing, or a configuration I could try? At this point, anything would be helpful.

Thanks,
Zel2008

This post has been edited by Zel2008: 29 March 2013 - 01:15 PM


Is This A Good Question/Topic? 0
  • +

Replies To: Testing on multiple OS's

#2 andrewsw  Icon User is offline

  • Fire giant boob nipple gun!
  • member icon

Reputation: 3354
  • View blog
  • Posts: 11,352
  • Joined: 12-December 12

Re: Testing on multiple OS's

Posted 29 March 2013 - 01:20 PM

Not my area but:

Quote

I have no idea how without getting 3 different computers, setting up the server on each one, duplicating all the files, and handling it that way.

wouldn't this be the best, most reliable, way of testing..?
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#3 AVReidy  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Regular
  • member icon

Reputation: 65
  • View blog
  • Posts: 431
  • Joined: 17-February 11

Re: Testing on multiple OS's

Posted 30 March 2013 - 07:20 PM

I don't see why you want to set up server software on each computer. Set up your site on one box (preferably Linux) as a test server, install VirtualBox on your Mac, grab an Ubuntu ISO, fire it up, test with FireFox, install and test with Chrome, then do the same with Windows and IE.

Also, if an operating system runs Chrome and FireFox, your site will function just as it does on OS X (minus the nice fonts, perhaps, but the functionality will persist so long as your site doesn't depend on some non-browser faculty like Flash), so just test the site using each browser in one operating system - preferably Windows (so you can test IE).
Was This Post Helpful? 1
  • +
  • -

#4 Koyume  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Head

Reputation: 15
  • View blog
  • Posts: 89
  • Joined: 19-February 13

Re: Testing on multiple OS's

Posted 01 April 2013 - 02:02 PM

View PostAVReidy, on 30 March 2013 - 08:20 PM, said:

I don't see why you want to set up server software on each computer. Set up your site on one box (preferably Linux) as a test server, install VirtualBox on your Mac, grab an Ubuntu ISO, fire it up, test with FireFox, install and test with Chrome, then do the same with Windows and IE.

Also, if an operating system runs Chrome and FireFox, your site will function just as it does on OS X (minus the nice fonts, perhaps, but the functionality will persist so long as your site doesn't depend on some non-browser faculty like Flash), so just test the site using each browser in one operating system - preferably Windows (so you can test IE).

As was stated by AVReidy, use Windows to test all browsers (You can use Opera/Safari/etc in Windows) to cross-browser your work. You don't need to go to the x amount of OS's that are out there to cross browser. Most people use Windows, with another chunk using Mac's. Linux distros are going to use some of the same ones that Windows use (Such as Chrome and Firefox). So setting up on different machines/OS's is just a waste of time and your resources imo.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

Page 1 of 1