11 Replies - 917 Views - Last Post: 03 June 2013 - 09:17 AM

#1 m_wylie85  Icon User is offline

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Help with terminology

Posted 03 June 2013 - 07:26 AM

HI all (sorry if this is the wrong forum) i am just filling out an application for a programming job and i don't know what some of the terminology means could you please tell me what this acronyms stands for.

-UDB

Thanks
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Replies To: Help with terminology

#2 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is online

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Re: Help with terminology

Posted 03 June 2013 - 07:30 AM

Not to be snarky, but if you don't know, then you probably don't know how to use it.

Wikipedia suggests that it could be one of

Quote

In computing

Universal Database, IBM DB2 original brandname
Universal Desktop Box, DEC Multia later brandname
User database, for T9 (predictive text)
Unit Data Block, in MDOS/MIDAS



but since I don't know what sort of work you're looking at doing, I don't know which if any of these is the one you're after.
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#3 m_wylie85  Icon User is offline

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Re: Help with terminology

Posted 03 June 2013 - 07:31 AM

No i don't know how to use it but if employers are wanting it then i would like to know what it is so i can learn to use it. The job is Software Engineer for liberty IT : https://liberty-it.e...DC004E?jobId=40

Thanks again

This post has been edited by m_wylie85: 03 June 2013 - 07:43 AM

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#4 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: Help with terminology

Posted 03 June 2013 - 07:52 AM

UDB does not appear in that job description. Maybe they updated it with the line RDBMS.

Looking at your topics being mostly about VB.NET and the job description specifying C# - Do you think you qualify?
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#5 JackOfAllTrades  Icon User is offline

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Re: Help with terminology

Posted 03 June 2013 - 08:00 AM

It was in the application form:

Quote

Tools
Outline your level of experience and proficiency under the following headings (basic,
practitioner, expert) in the following list provided. (For example, Java - 2 years - practitioner)
Sybase
UDB
UML


I'm betting, given this is an insurance company, that it's the first in jon.kiparsky's list from Wikipedia.
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#6 m_wylie85  Icon User is offline

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Re: Help with terminology

Posted 03 June 2013 - 08:00 AM

Yeah i know that it does not appear in the description it appears in the application form. Yeah i know know what you mean about me being more suited to vb, i have used c# a few times i am nowhere near as good with it as i am with vb but if i get an interview i will go and learn c# further. I am wanting a job doing VB rather than c# but to be honest i need a job soon as i am skint and i will just have to work my ass of to make sure i can do it.

PS @ jack - (Universal Database, IBM DB2 original brandname)

Thanks for that.

This post has been edited by m_wylie85: 03 June 2013 - 08:03 AM

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#7 DarenR  Icon User is offline

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Re: Help with terminology

Posted 03 June 2013 - 08:13 AM

Ahh I usually ignore a lot of the requirements when applying for a job because tgenerally they are placed by HR who has no idea what anythign means in the IT world. Case in point my current job had required java, c#, php, access...iI applied anyways and got the job because they didnt use or ever used any of the stuff hr put the job description.
We use sql vb.net javascript xml html xsl.
So what I am saying is that most of the time those job qualifications are junk...so dont be afraid to apply and many of them are company specific that you can only learn at that company.

good luck
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#8 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: Help with terminology

Posted 03 June 2013 - 08:16 AM

Sorry for how this sounds, but if you are in such dire straights then honesty is more important than subtlety... Stop looking at jobs that are so far above your capability, as it just wastes the precious little time you have.

You probably need to look for jobs that are introductory, intern or in some way indicate a starting position with the company. If the requirements read "expertise in C#" that does not mean "has kinda sorta read a little but never actually built a production-level application, but willing to learn on the job"

You're not going to bluff the interviewers into thinking you can do what you can't. They will ask questions, ask you to demonstrate your skills and so on. Better to look honest about 5 skills than lie about 10.
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#9 m_wylie85  Icon User is offline

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Re: Help with terminology

Posted 03 June 2013 - 08:18 AM

Thanks DarenR. I know what you mean and i will apply for most jobs that i find online. However i do understand the point tlhin'toq is making i don't want to take a job that i can't do.

PS yeah i agree with you and i did put down basic knowledge of C# and intermediate level of VB. I am looking for grad jobs just have to wait and see what i can find.

This post has been edited by m_wylie85: 03 June 2013 - 08:21 AM

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#10 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is online

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Re: Help with terminology

Posted 03 June 2013 - 08:28 AM

Given that many job postings do overstate or mis-state the requirements, and there's no way to know when you're reading the application whether this has happened, I think DarenR's policy is not completely out of line. If you see a job that lists a ridiculous number of required languages and frameworks and skills, and you have a respectable subset of them, applying is not unreasonable. Sorting out just what they need and what you have is a question for the phone screening - "Yes, I see you list every language back to Babbage as a requirement, now what is it you really need? Oh, I don't have that. Thanks anyway, bye".

This is a classic example of perverse incentives, since the structure of the enterprise gives you and the employer reasons to misrepresent yourselves and your needs, but this is the way things are. Until someone finds a way to change it, we have to live with it.
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#11 m_wylie85  Icon User is offline

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Re: Help with terminology

Posted 03 June 2013 - 08:37 AM

Just to validate jon.kiparsky:

Job title: Junior .Net Developer

requirements: Excellent knowledge of VB.Net, SQL 2005, Web Services and SOAP, XML

Junior job requires excellent knowledge of vb. I could understand intermediate level but excellent

http://www.nijobfind...entre/96658925/
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#12 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: Help with terminology

Posted 03 June 2013 - 09:17 AM

View Postm_wylie85, on 03 June 2013 - 09:37 AM, said:

Just to validate jon.kiparsky:

Job title: Junior .Net Developer

requirements: Excellent knowledge of VB.Net, SQL 2005, Web Services and SOAP, XML

Junior job requires excellent knowledge of vb. I could understand intermediate level but excellent

http://www.nijobfind...entre/96658925/


I don't see a problem with that even for a junior developer. At the very least you should have excellent knowledge of the language you are being paid to use. It doesn't say anything about 5 years doing OOP architecture, MVVM design, etc. etc. that would be expected above the junior level. Junior developer does not mean student. It means someone worth paying to do the job: With a lesser amount of responsibility and expectations. But you still have to earn your money and not expect it to be a paid continuation of college. There is a LOT more to being a developer than just familiarity with the syntax of your chosen language(s). Senior developers also have to be able to do UNIT testing, manage AGILE and SCRUM environments, manage other developers, coordinate several people/teams to see a project through the entire development life-cycle from concept to delivery.... and on and on. So yeah, a junior developer only being responsible for coding the modules they are assigned and not being responsible for the 'big picture' is about right, and to do that you have to at least be able to write code. That means you should have excellent knowledge of the language.
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