14 Replies - 2047 Views - Last Post: 25 August 2013 - 12:46 AM

#1 crasuant  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 1
  • View blog
  • Posts: 4
  • Joined: 30-June 13

Becoming a Master in Programming

Posted 15 August 2013 - 08:23 AM

The above statement is a bit much, but the ambition does exist within me. I would like to become a great programmer that can create high end video games for today and tomorrow's youth. My question is, what is the best way to become a good programmer. I've worked with C++ and can read a bit of code, but I'm not so foolish to say that I'm anywhere close to the level I envision for myself. I'm at a point where it comes down to what to study, and how to apply it. When I look at programming, I see a tool but have no idea how to implement it.

Is This A Good Question/Topic? 0
  • +

Replies To: Becoming a Master in Programming

#2 Goggz56  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Head

Reputation: 0
  • View blog
  • Posts: 68
  • Joined: 25-March 11

Re: Becoming a Master in Programming

Posted 15 August 2013 - 08:40 AM

Howdy Crasuant, I know what you mean. I want to be the best that I can be in programming and everything else IT. Python is a pretty easy and straightforward language to learn. You can make text-based games with it and also GUI. You can find a book to start out that is free, it is called Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart and also Making Games with Python and Pygame, also by Al Sweigart. I would recommend Invent Your Own Computer Games first since it gives you the basics. Cheers.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#3 modi123_1  Icon User is online

  • Suitor #2
  • member icon



Reputation: 9574
  • View blog
  • Posts: 36,268
  • Joined: 12-June 08

Re: Becoming a Master in Programming

Posted 15 August 2013 - 08:46 AM

Quote

what is the best way to become a good programmer.

The same way that's the quickest way to Carnegie Hall... practice, practice, practice.

Learn a language well enough that you can take a projects off our given project lists and know where to start, how to approach it, and can produce a solution. If you want to do videogames then pick up a book and work through it.
Was This Post Helpful? 1
  • +
  • -

#4 anonymous26  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Lover

Reputation: 1
  • View blog
  • Posts: 3,638
  • Joined: 26-November 10

Re: Becoming a Master in Programming

Posted 15 August 2013 - 09:10 AM

If you want to make 'high-end video games for tomorrow's youth' you have a huge amount of work ahead of you. I would focus on getting a compiled language learned, like C++, then start with games. Pretty much how I did it.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#5 Momerath  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Lover
  • member icon

Reputation: 1012
  • View blog
  • Posts: 2,444
  • Joined: 04-October 09

Re: Becoming a Master in Programming

Posted 15 August 2013 - 04:32 PM

Take a look at a study by Anders Ericsson, which is emphasized in the book "Outliers" that suggests to be an expert you need to spend 10,000 hours at the task. That works out to be about 20 hours a week for 10 years.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#6 anonymous26  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Lover

Reputation: 1
  • View blog
  • Posts: 3,638
  • Joined: 26-November 10

Re: Becoming a Master in Programming

Posted 15 August 2013 - 05:33 PM

At what though? Clearly some things are easier to master than others, in addition to 'expertise' being relative.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#7 depricated  Icon User is online

  • RISC Architecture is going to change everything.

Reputation: 918
  • View blog
  • Posts: 3,001
  • Joined: 13-September 08

Re: Becoming a Master in Programming

Posted 16 August 2013 - 01:20 PM

Really, modi's comparison to music is pretty damned spot on.

I spend about an hour a day playing alone, about 8 hours a week playing with my band, plus any gigs. I've been playing music since 5th grade, and bass for about 15 years. I still feel like I suck, but I know logically I'm a good bassist. How good? Not Carnegie Hall good!

As much as I know of musical theory though, I feel like there's still worlds more. And that's how I feel about programming too. I started out when I was 12, and for the better part of 18 years it's been a passionate hobby for me. I decided at one point that I want to program professionally and play music as my hobby - and now I'm there. But as much time and effort as I've put into learning to program and master as much as I can, I only know the basics. I'm junior level. But I love it, I love what I do. I'd love to make games, but I don't have a handle on graphics at all.

The path ahead is long, imo, and takes daily work and mental exercise to prepare. That said, it's totally worth it if it's something you love. Programming and Music are the two loves of my life, and I've never been happier with who I am than when I realized that I'm doing exactly what I want to do.

Hm...that went the wrong way haha. I'll leave it though. Point is this: There's always more to learn, and the best way to get good is to practice, practice, practice. Reading books is a great a way to learn new concepts, but implementing those concepts does wonders. I read the Gang of Four's Design Patterns and while I thought I understood them - I could write about their usefulness and their purpose - it never really struck home how amazing some of them are as when I had to prepare a front end to be able to communicate with different databases on the back end (voila, facade). In short, study will prepare you, but practice makes perfect.
Was This Post Helpful? 1
  • +
  • -

#8 cfoley  Icon User is offline

  • Cabbage
  • member icon

Reputation: 2069
  • View blog
  • Posts: 4,307
  • Joined: 11-December 07

Re: Becoming a Master in Programming

Posted 18 August 2013 - 03:35 AM

I think to become a master you have to have a love of programming. Nobody can put in all those hours of dedicated practice if it is a chore. Can you lose yourself for hours in a project you are doing just for fun? Does the suggestion of giving up programming seem absurd and slightly amusing? I can see you certainly have ambition but do you also have a love for the journey, for the processes of writing code and developing your skills?
Was This Post Helpful? 2
  • +
  • -

#9 crasuant  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 1
  • View blog
  • Posts: 4
  • Joined: 30-June 13

Re: Becoming a Master in Programming

Posted 20 August 2013 - 07:18 AM

OH, man. Thanks for all the responses, and advice. Definitely felt inspired reading through all the responses. Now planning to go out and do whatever it takes to become a great programmer, so that I can lead my company to newer heights.
Was This Post Helpful? 1
  • +
  • -

#10 Martyr2  Icon User is offline

  • Programming Theoretician
  • member icon

Reputation: 4425
  • View blog
  • Posts: 12,293
  • Joined: 18-April 07

Re: Becoming a Master in Programming

Posted 20 August 2013 - 01:58 PM

Well you could always go the quick way. I used performance enhancing drugs and cheated my way to the top. That was until the anti-doping programmers association found out when I failed one of my urine tests. They stripped me of my titles and banned me from competitive algorithms design and ordered me to pay restitution by helping newbie programmers on DIC. Som say I am a wash out, some say I am a failure even though 1 == 1 is always true. Still I consider myself a chronic "chemically dependent programmer" and so what if I took a substance that made me learn programming at lightning speed! Stroutsup, Wall, Gates... they all do it.

But then again I could have made all that up and just put in the thousands of hours of practice... I just can't say.
Was This Post Helpful? 2
  • +
  • -

#11 crasuant  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 1
  • View blog
  • Posts: 4
  • Joined: 30-June 13

Re: Becoming a Master in Programming

Posted 20 August 2013 - 08:01 PM

That last one felt sarcastic...Naah couldn't be. Thanks for the funny scenario.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#12 laytonsdad  Icon User is offline

  • Cheese and Sprinkles
  • member icon

Reputation: 450
  • View blog
  • Posts: 1,936
  • Joined: 30-April 10

Re: Becoming a Master in Programming

Posted 20 August 2013 - 08:16 PM

To become a "Master" you have to make a lot of rookie mistakes and keep going.
Posted Image
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#13 crasuant  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 1
  • View blog
  • Posts: 4
  • Joined: 30-June 13

Re: Becoming a Master in Programming

Posted 24 August 2013 - 09:34 PM

I shall keep practicing!
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#14 birko19  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 4
  • View blog
  • Posts: 15
  • Joined: 24-August 13

Re: Becoming a Master in Programming

Posted 24 August 2013 - 11:49 PM

Practice does indeed make you better. But in the end of the day, creativity and strong logic always comes out on top as far as I'm concerned. Creativity is something that you either have or don't have. Are you creative? Only you can answer that, but fear not, success is not dependent on you being a master programmer. You can still be a good programmer and work hard to achieve success.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#15 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is online

  • Pancakes!
  • member icon


Reputation: 8010
  • View blog
  • Posts: 13,716
  • Joined: 19-March 11

Re: Becoming a Master in Programming

Posted 25 August 2013 - 12:46 AM

View PostMomerath, on 15 August 2013 - 06:32 PM, said:

Take a look at a study by Anders Ericsson, which is emphasized in the book "Outliers" that suggests to be an expert you need to spend 10,000 hours at the task. That works out to be about 20 hours a week for 10 years.



Have you ever read that study? It's utterly unrelated to the stuff Gladwell made up about it. It's not even a study, it's a summary of some pretty questionable research that in any case can't be generalized, even to musicians, since it only deals with studies of musicians in the Western classical tradition who started learning at an early age. In other words, the best you could possibly get from this is "if you want to be an expert at playing second violin in an orchestra and you happen to be starting at age 10 or so, you'll probably be in a position to play in an orchestra about ten years later".

You certainly can't get from that to "if you want to be an expert at some arbitrary subject S, it'll take you 10K hours", or even to the conclusion that hours spent are the important thing. After all, there's nothing at all in the study that even allows you to assume that 10K hours represents even roughly what the typical student spent studying - mostly, we know that they spent around ten years - or that they ever achieved anything like mastery, for that matter. Strikingly, we don't know how one would even begin to calibrate "mastery" across disciplines, or why we should suppose that "mastery" correlates to a particular constant amount of time spent when the disciplines being mastered are so diverse, among other things which would be required to draw Gladwell's conclusions.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

Page 1 of 1