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#1 panzerfaust67  Icon User is offline

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How to factor out the GCF of a problem with parentheses

Posted 19 September 2013 - 03:20 PM

Math is my weak point and It takes me time to catch onto things and it doesnt help when my teacher sucks (too late for me to drop class) If some one could explain to me how to find the answer for this question that would be great and much appreciated.

I need to factor out the GCF of this problem

a(b+7) + 4(b+7)

also if some one could confirm that i did this problem correctly that would be cool
i had the factor the GCF out of this 12p(cubed) - 6p and i got 3p(4p(squared)- 2)i was going off of this tutorial http://www.algebrahe.../factoring/gcf/

If there are any other good tutorials please share with me.

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Replies To: How to factor out the GCF of a problem with parentheses

#2 Dogstopper  Icon User is offline

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Re: How to factor out the GCF of a problem with parentheses

Posted 19 September 2013 - 03:30 PM

GCF is basically what you could divide out of the problem easily (which means across addition, subtraction too). So in this case, you could do this:

(a(b+7) + 4(b+7))/(b+7)

Which would give you (a + 4) left over. Thus, your GCF is (b+7)
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#3 peace_fixation  Icon User is offline

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Re: How to factor out the GCF of a problem with parentheses

Posted 24 September 2013 - 07:06 AM

View Postpanzerfaust67, on 19 September 2013 - 03:20 PM, said:

Math is my weak point and It takes me time to catch onto things and it doesnt help when my teacher sucks (too late for me to drop class) If some one could explain to me how to find the answer for this question that would be great and much appreciated.

I need to factor out the GCF of this problem

a(b+7) + 4(b+7)

also if some one could confirm that i did this problem correctly that would be cool
i had the factor the GCF out of this 12p(cubed) - 6p and i got 3p(4p(squared)- 2)i was going off of this tutorial http://www.algebrahe.../factoring/gcf/

If there are any other good tutorials please share with me.



For your second problem, following the steps on the page you linked I get this:

12p^3 - 6p

examine the coefficients in each term for common factors

12 (12, 6, 4, 3, 2, 1)
6 (6, 3, 2, 1)

6 is the greatest common factor

examine the variable p in each term, and find the lowest exponent

p^3
p^1 (p^1 = p)

p^1 is greatest common factor

multiply the GCF terms together

6p is the GCF of the expression, and we can re-write it as 6p(2p^2 - 1) - you were close, but you chose 4 as the GCF term, when it was actually 6.

So for your first question:

a(b+7) + 4(b+7)

examine the coefficients for a GCF

a = 1a (1, a)
4 (4, 1)

1 is the GCF of the coefficients

now examine the variables for a GCF

(b + 7)
(b + 7)

they are the same, so the GCF is (b + 7)

multiply the GCF terms together

1(b + 7) = (b + 7)

so the GCF is (b + 7) and you can rewrite the expression as (b + 7)(a + 4)
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