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#1 CY5  Icon User is offline

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max 30 hop

Posted 17 January 2014 - 04:53 AM

C:>tracert google.com

Tracing route to google.com [74.125.200.101]
over a maximum of 30 hops:


Which protocol uses max 30 hop, i know its not rip(Routing Information Protocol has max 15 hop and 16 is for infinity)? and from Google search i found that we can even increase our hop count
tracert -h 50 google.com


Till max how much hop count can we increase?

This post has been edited by CY5: 17 January 2014 - 08:10 AM


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#2 modi123_1  Icon User is online

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Re: max 30 hop

Posted 17 January 2014 - 07:41 AM

What?
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#3 baavgai  Icon User is offline

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Re: max 30 hop

Posted 17 January 2014 - 08:26 AM

There is a TTL(Time to Live) flag in the packet.

This is actually what drives trace route. The first packet is sent out with a TTL 1 and the place it failed is recorded. The next TTL 2, etc.

More on the flag, which is a byte in IPv4, here: http://en.wikipedia....ki/Time_to_live
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#4 CY5  Icon User is offline

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Re: max 30 hop

Posted 17 January 2014 - 08:48 AM

Thanks for answer, I was confused between OSPF hop count and TTL hop count.
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#5 baavgai  Icon User is offline

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Re: max 30 hop

Posted 17 January 2014 - 09:47 AM

I believe, but I'm not 100% sure, that OSPF only lives in routers.

It's down there in the link layer. ARP is the only one you usually see from that level.

For network stuff, you'll usually start paying attention at the internet layer.

If you're serious about playing with networks, Windows in not the ideal environment. They do quirky things in places. A *nix flavor will let you experiment better, in general. Just being able to throw your NIC into promiscuous mode can be an education.
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#6 CY5  Icon User is offline

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Re: max 30 hop

Posted 18 January 2014 - 01:54 AM

Quote

When an OSPF router receives an advertisement from a neighbor it will NEVER just relay it. (for one thing the multicast address used by OSPF for advertisements is a link local address which should never be forwarded) The router takes the information from the advertisement, puts it into its link state data base, and then generates a new advertisement reflecting the information.

I do not think that we have articulated it clearly yet, but it seems to me that this whole discussion is confusing the functionality of 2 protocols. There is TTL which is used by the IP protocol to minimize the impact of any packet that happens to get into a routing loop. And there is hop count which is used by some routing protocols to determine if something is so far away that it should no longer be advertised. These are 2 different functions in 2 different protocols and we should not treat them as if they were the same.

So the answer to the original question is that in OSPF hop count is unlimited. The delivery of data packets may be bounded by TTL but advertisement of destinations in OSPF is not limited at all by hop count.


I found this answer on below link, is it correct.

https://supportforum...m/thread/198270
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