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#1 no2pencil  Icon User is online

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Gizmodo : Make me do science again!

Posted 30 May 2014 - 07:00 AM

NASA's Lost Satellite Just Made Its First Contact With Earth in 17 Years

Talk about open source! You can read the full article (linked above), but the short of it is that NASA abandon the satellite Gizmodo in 1997 as it no longer had a purpose. Since then the broadcast antenna had been taken down. To their surprise the satellite is still fueled & waiting for instructions. With no funding or purpose, NASA basically handed over the schematics to the public & allowed them to have at it.

But with a short window of opportunity & availability they had to hurry.

They raised $150k+ & made communications.

How neat is this?! Recycling 70's communications software, recreating technology on the fly. I wish I had seen this earlier.

What would you do with a satellite? What can you do with a satellite?

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Replies To: Gizmodo : Make me do science again!

#2 modi123_1  Icon User is offline

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Re: Gizmodo : Make me do science again!

Posted 30 May 2014 - 07:30 AM

Let's see..

- Make long distance prank calls.
- upload pr0n to it.
- download the pr0n back and compare bit corruption
- upload some sort of AI to it in hopes that cosmic radiation bombardment makes it a real boy.. er.. being.
- try to get a deathray out of the parts there..


Oh.. and I was a little confused at first.. the satallite is called ISEE-3, not Gizmodo. From that gizmodo link the original purpose:

Quote

The intrepid ISEE-3 spacecraft was sent away from its primary mission to study the physics of the solar wind extending its mission of discovery to study two comets.



It's an old fart too!

Quote

International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE-3), a spacecraft that was launched in 1978 to study Earth's magnetosphere and repurposed in 1983 to study two comets. Renamed the International Cometary Explorer (ICE), it has been in a heliocentric orbit since then, traveling just slightly faster than Earth
...
Twelve of its 13 instruments were working when we last checked on its condition, sometime prior to 1999.

http://www.planetary...836-isee-3.html


Posted Image
http://hackaday.com/...iceisee-3-home/


Specs: http://mdkenny.custo...t.au/ISEE-3.pdf
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#3 depricated  Icon User is offline

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Re: Gizmodo : Make me do science again!

Posted 30 May 2014 - 08:02 AM

2 Girls, 1 Satellite incoming
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#4 creativecoding  Icon User is offline

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Re: Gizmodo : Make me do science again!

Posted 31 May 2014 - 02:52 AM

inb4 space neutrality petitions
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#5 alapee  Icon User is offline

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Re: Gizmodo : Make me do science again!

Posted 07 July 2014 - 01:46 PM

Amazing, Isn't it? It has 12 of 13 instruments working from circa 1970s / early 1980s and it has been in space for 17 years but if you drop a phone that was made last year it will break completely. Technology hasn't gotten smarter it has gotten cheaper.

This post has been edited by alapee: 07 July 2014 - 01:47 PM

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#6 depricated  Icon User is offline

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Re: Gizmodo : Make me do science again!

Posted 07 July 2014 - 05:58 PM

That's oversimplifying it a bit. The reason that technology is so stable by comparison is that it's so simple by comparison. I mean, by the same logic it's amazing that millstones used to last as long as they did, when tires on cars blow out to a minor puncture! Sure the base technology is the same, but the complexity involved in the latter is vastly greater.

Technology has gotten smaller and more complex. As such it's become more fragile and susceptible to damage. That delicacy does not make it better or worse, simply different. It's certainly not that it's getting cheaper - the cost in human life that it takes to make a gamestation controller is way more than the cost in human life it took to get to the moon.
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