4 Replies - 1477 Views - Last Post: 16 June 2014 - 01:27 AM

#1 laytonsdad  Icon User is online

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Color Scan Pen

Posted 10 June 2014 - 10:46 AM

Will this:
Posted Image
replace this:
Posted Image

You decide... http://www.iflscienc...any-color-world

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Replies To: Color Scan Pen

#2 modi123_1  Icon User is online

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Re: Color Scan Pen

Posted 10 June 2014 - 11:03 AM

I am not sure if a pen that picks the RGB color up from a scan (woah nelly light difference will be a part) and then pumps out that color of ink is going to be functional.. feasible, sure, but functional probably not. My first balk - ink prices. Great googlie-mooglie printer ink blows wait until you need to fill this bad boy!

Nifty concept, but I give it a 'meh'.
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#3 ge∅  Icon User is offline

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Re: Color Scan Pen

Posted 11 June 2014 - 03:16 AM

As a photographer/graphic designer, I prefer to trust a proper spectrophotometer if I want to pick a physical colour and get RGB (or L*a*b*) values. And I don't see the point of physically reproducing the colour on paper either: you will have to scan your creation if you want to share it anyway, and there are distortions when you scan and print colours:

- The colour range the pen can physically produce is not as wide as the sensor's colour space. Typically, some bright saturated colours will appear dull on paper.
- When you will scan your masterpiece, you will experience the same issue, but reversed : the scanner's colour space will probably be sRGB and won't be as wide as the pen's colour space. Moreover, most scanners burn colours and are very unfaithful to the original.

So, when colour really matter, you prefer to use a proper scanner, a spectrophotometer or a calibrated camera, extract RGB or L*a*b* values directly from the physical object and then work on a computer with a graphic tablet.

Concerning other needs : when you use a multicolour pen, you want standard frank red/green/blue colours because they have a special meaning in our culture. Variations can be misinterpreted (typically, when school girls use magenta/violet to write, you never know if they mean red:correction or blue:content).

This post has been edited by ge∅: 11 June 2014 - 03:19 AM

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#4 laytonsdad  Icon User is online

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Re: Color Scan Pen

Posted 11 June 2014 - 10:26 AM

I think you guy are both right, Good Idea, not worth producing.
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#5 ge∅  Icon User is offline

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Re: Color Scan Pen

Posted 16 June 2014 - 01:27 AM

I thought about it this weekend when I saw this little girl trying to reproduce her mother's hair with colour pencils. If you tell children they can fill their pen with any colour they want, they will discover a lot more colours (because children often think colours as materials : grass material, mum's hair material, sun material, etc.). It could be a cool and educational toy for children.

There is also another use case : restoration of little objects. You probably have seen those floor tile grout cleaner pens that actually apply a plain white on your sealing. Grout is white so there is no problem but sometimes you would like to be able to fill a small defect in an object with the same colour as the rest without having to repaint the whole object.
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