5 Replies - 1221 Views - Last Post: 06 November 2014 - 01:29 PM

#1 drecc4  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 0
  • View blog
  • Posts: 2
  • Joined: 06-November 14

How to find good talent

Posted 06 November 2014 - 12:49 PM

I'm looking for help in finding talented software developers who can help bring my idea to life. I should mention that I have absolutely no experience in this space, and am more of a business oriented thinker. Ultimately, I'm looking for a developer who would be interested in partnering with me and share the ownership rather than be paid by the hour/project. Chances are this relationship would require meeting several different developers, but does anyone have a good place to start?

Thanks

Is This A Good Question/Topic? 0
  • +

Replies To: How to find good talent

#2 modi123_1  Icon User is offline

  • Suitor #2
  • member icon



Reputation: 13401
  • View blog
  • Posts: 53,498
  • Joined: 12-June 08

Re: How to find good talent

Posted 06 November 2014 - 12:54 PM

Is there any particular reason you are adverse to paying for a developer's time up front?

Not to be contrarian, but have you considered how this looks from the developer's end? You are essentially saying "I want greatly skilled folk to work for nothing but the promise this venture may see some profit in an undetermined time in the future". In another way you are asking for someone to be married to your project, your idea, just so they may get a paycheck out of the time sank into it. Darn near tantamount to asking "why can't I get exception talent for no pay".
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#3 macosxnerd101  Icon User is offline

  • Games, Graphs, and Auctions
  • member icon




Reputation: 12135
  • View blog
  • Posts: 45,120
  • Joined: 27-December 08

Re: How to find good talent

Posted 06 November 2014 - 01:01 PM

Some developers go for this, but not all. You might look at your local entrepreneurial community and see what's going on. If you have a good idea, I'd be prepared with your contributions to the task. Saying "I'm the business guy" probably won't impress folks. Do you have folks in the industry that can help you market your product? Do you know venture capitalists or angel investors that are willing to fund you once you have a developer? Folks who are entrepreneurially minded won't be entirely averse to equity, provided they get to know you and see you are invested in the project and have a physical stake in it. That said, folks online don't you and probably won't be interested in jumping on the sweat for equity deal.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#4 drecc4  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 0
  • View blog
  • Posts: 2
  • Joined: 06-November 14

Re: How to find good talent

Posted 06 November 2014 - 01:09 PM

I see your point and definitely understand that what I am seeking may not be realistic. But from my standpoint, I want to partner with someone who has a vested interest in the project rather than someone who is solely doing a job to make some cash. I have some experience in hiring out good (expensive) developers at an hourly rate and, i must say, it did not end well. We spent in excess of 100K only to receive a half ass product that did not meet the needs we established beforehand.

What I am seeking may not be for the faint of heart, but I do believe it is possible to find someone who would buy into this business venture and take a little more risk for the possibility of a very profitable upside. I would be willing to pay a stipend in order to keep the developer motivated, but the rate would have to be very (very) reasonable.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#5 macosxnerd101  Icon User is offline

  • Games, Graphs, and Auctions
  • member icon




Reputation: 12135
  • View blog
  • Posts: 45,120
  • Joined: 27-December 08

Re: How to find good talent

Posted 06 November 2014 - 01:19 PM

Definitely you'll want to find the entrepreneurial community in your area. Hackathons, angel investors, entrepreneurial clubs at local colleges, coworking spaces, etc., are probably good places to start. It's definitely a process where you want to get to know the developer, and vice-versa. The developer will (or should) want to see what you bring to the table (besides being "the ideas man"), and you want to make sure you get a quality person.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#6 modi123_1  Icon User is offline

  • Suitor #2
  • member icon



Reputation: 13401
  • View blog
  • Posts: 53,498
  • Joined: 12-June 08

Re: How to find good talent

Posted 06 November 2014 - 01:29 PM

Quote

I have some experience in hiring out good (expensive) developers at an hourly rate and, i must say, it did not end well. We spent in excess of 100K only to receive a half ass product that did not meet the needs we established beforehand.

Just be warned that equating expensive and good are not the same thing. I am moderately priced and I have yet to have a complaint on the work returned. If your product, unexpected, came back half-assed then I have to ask - how did you manage it? Did you have a clear design? Mark out mile stones? Ask to see updates? Have some user acceptance testing? Communicate?


Quote

I want to partner with someone who has a vested interest in the project rather than someone who is solely doing a job to make some cash.

Someone to share that mill stone? ;)/> (I kid.. I kid.) I mean I am not looking to start a business, nor am I looking to get embroiled in something for a ten year investment. I enjoy designing code and bringing interesting ideas to light. I certainly do not want to make some sort of life long commitment to one problem.


At the end of it - I guess my view is still you are asking for a lot of something for nothing. A lot of time, a lot of talent, a lot of time building said talent, etc for a gamble. (See the urban legend of Picasso's Napkin) If the idea's a sure lock why not snag a loan to pay for a dev/group of devs and recoup it later? *shrug* As I said - this is my point of view from a senior dev that has been down this road a few times to only get burned.


I would highly advocate finding someone local if that's your need. You may need to scale back the lofty measures of 'good talent' in light that this is 'sweat equity' until something happens. google for game dev meet ups, conferences, *thons, etc. Maybe poke a local college's CS department if they have any ear open for folk. Good luck!
Was This Post Helpful? 1
  • +
  • -

Page 1 of 1