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#1 OliverKuchies  Icon User is offline

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How is Linux implemented in a LAMP Stack?

Posted 24 December 2014 - 04:26 AM

I've been developing with PHP for quite a while now, I have experience with Apache And MySQL etc etc. But I have no idea how the L in LAMP stands for Linux? I generally hire a server from a web hosting company which has everything pre-installed so i'm pretty clueless:

Could someone give me a brief explanation of a LAMP stack? I assume I need this when entering the industry.

Thanks so much! Merry Christmas :)/>

This post has been edited by OliverKuchies: 24 December 2014 - 04:36 AM


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Replies To: How is Linux implemented in a LAMP Stack?

#2 no2pencil  Icon User is online

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Re: How is Linux implemented in a LAMP Stack?

Posted 24 December 2014 - 05:23 AM

It's the "L" in LAMP. It's the OS.

Really in web hosting the OS is a matter of personal preference for usability, configuration, & security.

When a request to view a webpage comes into the server, it is on a port. The standard port being80. That port binding is between the web hosting software "Apache" & the OS. Apache then recieves the traffic & processes html & PHP. Though important for reliability & so on from a hosting viewpoint, theOS can almost be irrelevant from a development view point.
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#3 baavgai  Icon User is online

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Re: How is Linux implemented in a LAMP Stack?

Posted 24 December 2014 - 05:57 AM

Linux is simply the Operating System. You can search around for WAMP and find near identical functionality with Windows as the OS.

From a developer's perspective, as long AMP are there you're good to go, the OS doesn't impact writing the web application. Indeed, the A isn't a huge deal either: you could swap it out for any old web server that supports P, for the most part.

However, from an environment perspective, the L matters. Linux is a modular OS and you needn't run what you don't need, so a LAMP server can be pretty lean and mean. Windows will always require the whole OS, unneeded stuff and all, like a GUI. In Linux, you can do all things from the command line. Windows, not so much. The Linux architecture also lends itself to a number of server considerations.

ISPs prefer Linux because, well, it's free. You could use any *nix you like, but HP, or IBM, or whoever, will make you pay, a lot.

From a web developer perspective knowing the Linux OS is helpful: being able to just SSH to the box, maybe rsync data, write helpful scripts, etc. You won't suffer for not knowing the L, but you may suffer less if you do.
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#4 no2pencil  Icon User is online

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Re: How is Linux implemented in a LAMP Stack?

Posted 24 December 2014 - 06:52 AM

View Postbaavgai, on 24 December 2014 - 07:57 AM, said:

From a web developer perspective knowing the Linux OS is helpful: being able to just SSH to the box, maybe rsync data, write helpful scripts, etc. You won't suffer for not knowing the L, but you may suffer less if you do.

I believe the suffering will come from a lack of familiarity with security options. Any OS will have these issues. It works out of the box, & is as secure as a screen door.
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#5 CTphpnwb  Icon User is offline

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Re: How is Linux implemented in a LAMP Stack?

Posted 24 December 2014 - 07:44 AM

A note on compatibility: Because they're *nix, Mac and Linux bash scripts tend to work equally well on both systems. You can connect directly from the Terminal, too. I've never found a need to alter a script to run on the other OS, but I'm guessing there must be some differences. Windows doesn't have bash or other *nix shells, so writing a script for LAMP will require a connection using something like PuTTY.
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