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#1 jhonr  Icon User is offline

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The ideal Computer Science student/employee

Posted 12 November 2015 - 01:04 AM

Hello!

I am doing a research project for school on the "ideal computer science student/employee."

I'd love to hear your guy's opinions on...
the types of people you think are best suited for computer science,
the types of people you think are most likely to be attracted to computer science,
and the various qualities, personality traits, skills and other qualification you think are essential for being successful in the computer science industry.

I'd also love to hear any of your personal experiences on why you were attracted to this field and what helped you succeed.

Thanks!

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#2 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: The ideal Computer Science student/employee

Posted 12 November 2015 - 05:02 AM

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One that can research.
For example: There are at least 20 threads just like this one asking the same thing. Someone that realized they are probably aren't the first to ask a question and thus can get a faster solution to a question by just looking around, would be the employee that gets the job completed faster.
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#3 modi123_1  Icon User is offline

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Re: The ideal Computer Science student/employee

Posted 12 November 2015 - 07:41 AM

Robots. The answer is robots. The cheaper and more pliant the better.

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#4 TechnoBear  Icon User is offline

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Re: The ideal Computer Science student/employee

Posted 22 January 2016 - 06:17 AM

Well, nobody is really going to give you a solid answer because this question gets asked a fair amount and in general everyone is kinda busy on their own stuff. I happen to have some time while I wait on QA and to avoid doing the design docs for my next project...

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the types of people you think are best suited for computer science,


Personally, I think anyone has the capacity to be suited for a CS role. All it really takes is an understanding of mathematics and a bit of patience. All in all, this field isn't as hard as it looks from the outside.

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the types of people you think are most likely to be attracted to computer science,


Well, in my personal experience, it is mostly people on the fringe of society in some way. It' the kids in school that pushed themselves into their books and their studies, those that weren't afraid of doing a little research and who had a drive to learn new things. This field is fairly enticing for those that like to keep learning, like me, because of how quickly it can all change and how many new paths are opening up.


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and the various qualities, personality traits, skills and other qualification you think are essential for being successful in the computer science industry.


* Patience - The most important as it is needed for nearly everything
* Problem Solving - Utilizes a lot of patience and the ability to critically analyse things, even your own work
* Ability to accept criticism - Many people will happily tell you when something doesn't work or could be better
* Ability to work without positive reinforcement - "If you do things right, people won't know you've done anything at all." In this field you are unlikely to be acknowledged when things are working as they should be
* Willingness to learn - As stated, the field changes constantly and new technologies seem to be created daily

I think that covers the majority of it. I'm a poor example but it is possible to do well in this field without selling your soul to the devil.

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I'd also love to hear any of your personal experiences on why you were attracted to this field and what helped you succeed.


I was attracted to the field mainly cause I just like computers. When I was a kid I showed interest in computers and my father pushed me to keep learning about them and working with them, his goal was to just not let me become a mechanic. I tried college back in England but I wasn't ready, my dad died and I failed to keep up as I should have. I fell into a bad scene and gave up on computers pretty much all together. Young me thought working bars for the rest of his life would be enough, so i bummed around for a few years doing that.

At 19 I began despising the life I was living. I felt like I was stagnating and the once exciting lifestyle i had got boring. I started looking into opportunities to change my life around and that is when I found college in America. I moved out here, about 6/7 years ago now, and attended college for CompSci with a focus on Networking. My intention was to become a Network Admin, then during my time at college I had to take programming classes. I loved them. That is when I realized that I had finally found something I enjoy that can be a profession, and a well paying one.

I graduated college and started looking for work. My first job was at a radio station, as a DJ, but I spent the few years I worked for them writing small code projects to facilitate the running of the station. From there I moved to a software development company which specialized in tax software, I really enjoyed that but they hit a rough patch and had to let people go so I offered myself up to be laid off to save the other developers. Which led me to the job I have now.

I'm very nicely compensated and I'm the lead on the projects I have here, so in reality it was a huge promotion from when I was as a Junior Developer at my last job but I hate it here. My projects are designed to automate people out of work, they've already laid people off whose jobs were directly related to things they've had me work on and supposedly they believe the completion of this next project could let them get rid of around 1000 more people around the world. Some may say I'm succeeding, but i don't. Yes, I make a lot of money. Yes, my title jumped from Junior Developer to Senior Software Engineer but I don't feel like I'm achieving anything good here.

The bonus is, though, that I'm planning to return to England. This job makes moving back to a country where I haven't existed for the past 7 years much easier and I don't feel horrible about leaving them because they are actually quite evil.

So there you Go:

Born -> Like Computers -> Fail College -> Fail Life -> Try Again -> Pass College -> Pass Life -> Become Evil -> ???
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#5 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is offline

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Re: The ideal Computer Science student/employee

Posted 22 January 2016 - 08:37 AM

The ideal CS student is probably not the ideal employee. The ideal CS student, for example, is into research on fundamentals of the discipline, and will happily spend a year to knock some epsilon off the exponent for the running time of a matrix multiplication, which is not what you want in an employee.
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#6 birko19  Icon User is offline

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Re: The ideal Computer Science student/employee

Posted 05 February 2016 - 08:46 PM

View Postjon.kiparsky, on 22 January 2016 - 03:37 PM, said:

The ideal CS student is probably not the ideal employee. The ideal CS student, for example, is into research on fundamentals of the discipline, and will happily spend a year to knock some epsilon off the exponent for the running time of a matrix multiplication, which is not what you want in an employee.


Bingo, being a CS student and an employee are two different things and the faster new grads realize this the more likely you'll succeed in their future.

As a student in college you will be doing a lot of work that is not very relevant for future employment. Sure you'll be learning the fundamentals, but if you don't learn how to be practical in real life with your knowledge you're going to have a hard time in the work field unless you work in Academia.

My advice for new grads is you need to accept that you're starting from scratch when you finish school. You have good knowledge, but you'll need to translate your skills to the real world now. Here are some good tips:

- You don't have to know everything, but make sure you know your basics.

- Have a great positive and likable attitude, this takes you a long way, trust me.

- Be adaptable to change, if you don't continue swimming you'll drown.

- Keep your programming skills sharp and let go of your school theory, chances are you won't need your advance math or physics skills unless you're working in such fields.

- In addition to the point above, keep your code simple and short if you can. It's better to write understandable code rather than build a rocket just so you can demonstrate advanced programming skills, complicated code is not a good thing, specially when it's not needed.

- Be passionate about what you do, I always notice good programmers who truly love their art usually program for fun on the side, not saying it's mandatory to do that but you'll have a greater chance succeeding if you're enthusiastic in what you do.

There are other tips but this is off the top of my head.

This post has been edited by birko19: 05 February 2016 - 08:48 PM

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#7 Skydiver  Icon User is offline

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Re: The ideal Computer Science student/employee

Posted 06 February 2016 - 05:55 PM

It's why most places use the job title "software developer" or "software engineer" even though they look for people with a Computer Science background.
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