2 Replies - 1035 Views - Last Post: 19 February 2016 - 10:05 AM

#1 whatame55  Icon User is offline

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San Bernardino iPhone problem

Posted 19 February 2016 - 09:09 AM

This may be a stupid question since I'm not very well versed in the complexities of mobile security, but why can't the FBI crack into the San Bernardino iPhone? If they're willing to go through the complex process of receiving a court order to help break the encryption and go up against one of our modern tech giants, shouldn't an equal or lesser amount of resources be able to break into a single device?
If they really needed to break into that phone ASAP couldn't they just make distribute perfect clones to a number of computers, then copy that clone on each computer a number of times(Let's say 20 for this argument's sake), run the phone through an iOS emulator and then be able to try out 6-10 (depending on how much time each computer will be expected to complete its run in) passcodes assigned to it from the 10000 section assigned to it from a master computer, then delete the clone when it has finished and boot the next? 6*20 = 120 so with less than 100 computers couldn't they reasonably crack into the phone in 2-3 days?
Of course, like I said, I'm not anywhere near an expert on mobile security, so I don't even know if you can pheasibly boot clones on modern iOS emulators. The news just got me to thinking and I want to know just how wrong I am :)

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Replies To: San Bernardino iPhone problem

#2 modi123_1  Icon User is offline

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Re: San Bernardino iPhone problem

Posted 19 February 2016 - 09:30 AM

Hmm. well.. first post and you drop that one off in the pool.

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but why can't the FBI crack into the San Bernardino iPhone?

Here's the short of it.

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Right now, iPhone users have the option to set a security feature that only allows a certain number of tries to guess the correct passcode to unlock the phone before all the data on the iPhone is deleted. It's a security measure Apple put in place to keep important data out of the wrong hands.
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That's why the FBI wants Apple to disable the security feature. Once the security is crippled, agents would be able to guess as many combinations as possible.

http://www.usatoday....-deal/80481766/
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#3 whatame55  Icon User is offline

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Re: San Bernardino iPhone problem

Posted 19 February 2016 - 10:05 AM

Quote

Right now, iPhone users have the option to set a security feature that only allows a certain number of tries to guess the correct passcode to unlock the phone before all the data on the iPhone is deleted. It's a security measure Apple put in place to keep important data out of the wrong hands.
...
That's why the FBI wants Apple to disable the security feature. Once the security is crippled, agents would be able to guess as many combinations as possible.


My question is more of can an emulator take a perfect copy/clone of a phone and then boot to the locked screen with it and use it as if it were the real phone, or is there an individualized encryption process that blocks you from copying it over at all, preventing mass distributive brute force attacks? If you can boot "the device" on multiple different emulators at once then you wouldn't be blocked by the 10 login attempt problem because you would effectively be using your first attempt on all of the different copies of the phone.
I'll take it from your answer that the encryption process also encrypts the boot data from the phone so mass distributive brute force wouldn't work. Thanks!
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