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#1 DADDYCARDONA  Icon User is offline

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C++ without fear Edition 3

Posted 13 April 2016 - 06:24 AM

I am a beginner with C++ and decided to try to go at it again. I have learned a real little bit or basics in 98 at college with Borland Turbo C++. Yes that was the first and last time I used it. My son has been very fluid with Lua Scripting on Roblox and decided he would like to try something else like C++ and I am looking for a book that would be great with Bucky's videos on thenewboston.com. I was wondering if this book is good because they did not have C++ primer at barns and nobles. I googled reviews and got 3 reviews from 7 different sites. So I am asking people that might have read this book is it a good starter would it help us on our journey? You guys are awesome and the name of the book is the title C++ without fear 3rd Edition

by the way I looked for other books but every site i went to was like 2011 and talked about C++ 11 and this one was newer. thanks :)

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#2 DADDYCARDONA  Icon User is offline

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Re: C++ without fear Edition 3

Posted 13 April 2016 - 09:16 AM

I am talking about third edition not the first or second. Someone said it was horrid but that was the first edition.
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#3 Bench  Icon User is offline

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Re: C++ without fear Edition 3

Posted 13 April 2016 - 12:04 PM

As far as most of the core language and libraries go, C++11 is really still the "latest version" of C++. C++14 includes a bunch of minor tweaks and hotfixes, many of which either relate to weird edge/corner cases in the language, or relate to other advanced features, or they just make your compiler a bit more intelligent/intuitive.

As a beginner, most of the changes won't affect anything you learn; you should consider any beginner book which covers C++11 as being completely up-to-date, although you should certainly try to use a C++14 compiler because having a smarter compiler is always a good thing.

I don't know anything specifically about the 3rd edition of that book, but I'm aware of why the first and second editions were terrible; they were both packed full of misinformation, mistakes, broken examples and focused mainly on C or "C with classes" (which might have been a good description of C++ back in 1995, but not any more), with the second edition adding a few "nods" to new standard libraries, yet generally ignoring those libraries in the rest of the book.

it's entirely possible that the author has revamped the entire book in the 3rd edition, and maybe it has been properly reviewed for accuracy with all the problems fixed; indeed I hope that is the case because C++ needs more good quality books. However I don't have my hopes set very high, and my default expectation would be to find that the 3rd edition is probably just the 2nd edition with some new chapters added.
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#4 DADDYCARDONA  Icon User is offline

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Re: C++ without fear Edition 3

Posted 13 April 2016 - 07:37 PM

View PostBench, on 13 April 2016 - 02:04 PM, said:

I hope that is the case because C++ needs more good quality books. However I don't have my hopes set very high, and my default expectation would be to find that the 3rd edition is probably just the 2nd edition with some new chapters added.

Do you know of any for a beginner like myself that would be beneficial? I am going to take this one back tomorrow because I finally got someone to actually respond to my post. I am deeply saddened because this guy was bragging about how good he was and I already found an error. He talked about how he worked for Microsoft for ten years and said
#include "stdafx.h"
int _tmain(int arg, _TCHAR* argv[]) {
	return 0;
}
// this is what should be the norm when you open a new project but i get

int main(){

}
// as the norm 


So I declare BS ;)
Additionally, the only book I see that seems to be a true hit is that Primer C++ which is like 4 years old.

This post has been edited by DADDYCARDONA: 13 April 2016 - 07:39 PM

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#5 macosxnerd101  Icon User is online

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Re: C++ without fear Edition 3

Posted 13 April 2016 - 09:32 PM

Check out this pinned resource thread.
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#6 DADDYCARDONA  Icon User is offline

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Re: C++ without fear Edition 3

Posted 14 April 2016 - 01:47 AM

I was looking for that post did not think anyone posted after me because i did not get emails but then i realized that i never clicked watch this.
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#7 Bench  Icon User is offline

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Re: C++ without fear Edition 3

Posted 14 April 2016 - 02:03 AM

View PostDADDYCARDONA, on 14 April 2016 - 03:37 AM, said:

Do you know of any for a beginner like myself that would be beneficial? I am going to take this one back tomorrow because I finally got someone to actually respond to my post. I am deeply saddened because this guy was bragging about how good he was and I already found an error. He talked about how he worked for Microsoft for ten years and said
#include "stdafx.h"
int _tmain(int arg, _TCHAR* argv[]) {
	return 0;
} 
If you are using MS Visual C++ and create a new Visual Studio "Win32 Application Project" then you will get this. It's not standard, it's a microsoft-specific entry-point definition.

(That's not to say that it's "incorrect" per-se, because it's useful if you do want a Win32 project, however I'd think that a Win32 project isn't really much use to you at the moment. For now you probably just want a plain old standard C++ project without all the extra Microsoft stuff getting in the way.

View PostDADDYCARDONA, on 14 April 2016 - 03:37 AM, said:

// this is what should be the norm when you open a new project but i get

int main(){

}
// as the norm 

Correct, this is the standard entry point definition.

If you're using MS Visual Studio, then the type of project to create is a Win32 Console Application (not a "Win32 application").

When you're in the New Project screen, you should un-tick the option for Precompiled Headers, and then you will get a standard-conforming project which doesn't rely on Microsoft-specific stuff like stdafx.h or _tmain.
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View PostDADDYCARDONA, on 14 April 2016 - 03:37 AM, said:

Additionally, the only book I see that seems to be a true hit is that Primer C++ which is like 4 years old.

C++ really hasn't changed much at all in nearly 5 years, as I mentioned in my earlier post, C++11 was the last major release for the language standard. Stan Lippman's C++ Primer is probably one of the few genuinely good C++ books at the moment.

This post has been edited by Bench: 14 April 2016 - 02:32 AM

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#8 DADDYCARDONA  Icon User is offline

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Re: C++ without fear Edition 3

Posted 14 April 2016 - 03:02 AM

View PostBench, on 14 April 2016 - 04:03 AM, said:

View PostDADDYCARDONA, on 14 April 2016 - 03:37 AM, said:

Do you know of any for a beginner like myself that would be beneficial? I am going to take this one back tomorrow because I finally got someone to actually respond to my post. I am deeply saddened because this guy was bragging about how good he was and I already found an error. He talked about how he worked for Microsoft for ten years and said
#include "stdafx.h"
int _tmain(int arg, _TCHAR* argv[]) {
	return 0;
} 
If you are using MS Visual C++ and create a new Visual Studio "Win32 Application Project" then you will get this. It's not standard, it's a microsoft-specific entry-point definition.

I actually don't see that I see this new application etc.. its on the picture

Additionally I did what you said in the pictures and I still got the inherited #include "stdafx.h" I just downloaded this studio last week just wondering.

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#9 Skydiver  Icon User is online

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Re: C++ without fear Edition 3

Posted 14 April 2016 - 05:48 AM

From About the Author on Amazon:

Quote

He was also a member of the Visual C++ 1.0 team.

And his LinkedIn page says:

Quote

Manager
Microsoft
1986 1996 (10 years)


I'm guessing that Bench guess about a few new chapters being added is pretty accurate.
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#10 Bench  Icon User is offline

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Re: C++ without fear Edition 3

Posted 14 April 2016 - 05:56 AM

View PostDADDYCARDONA, on 14 April 2016 - 11:02 AM, said:

Additionally I did what you said in the pictures and I still got the inherited #include "stdafx.h" I just downloaded this studio last week just wondering.

Ah, i've just tried that again and it seems that disabling precompiled headers doesn't automatically remove stdafx.h from the project; although it disables it so that you don't need it. You can safely delete it yourself so long as the precompiled headers option has been disabled.

The easiest check is to use the minimum complete/valid C++ program. If it builds and runs, you're all set up:
int main() 
{
} 
Note - you might prefer to use the "Run without debugging" option from the Visual Studio 'Debug' menu (or CTRL+F5) quite a lot, because that pauses the console before the program exits.
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