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#1 626262  Icon User is offline

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Question to pro programmers

Posted 10 May 2016 - 02:16 AM

Hello,

I want know your opinion guys. Currently I am studying in the university which is not IT related. Next year I will be graduating. But I found out that I do not want to do anything related with my current studies. I spent my childhood messing around with programming stuff for fun, nothing serious, I was just interested in that a lot. I thought that I will study IT/programming in the university, but in the last minute I changed my mind, so I chose another university. Anyway. My main question is it possible for a self-taught guy get into IT industry? I do not want to work anything related with my current specialization, I want to switch to IT. But I don't want to go to another university and spend 4 more years there. Also I learn on my own pretty good and I am a fast learner. I am thinking by starting learning SQL from scratch and when I will be able to operate it pretty fluently maybe I will start looking for a small task job? Is it possible? Because if I would get a small job at least something related with programming such as SQL, then I would start gradually improving my knowledge by learning other stuff such as php, C++ or whatever I will be attracted to. Please, any opinion matters, I really do want to get rid of my current specialization. Maybe you have any tips or thoughts?

Thanks!

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Replies To: Question to pro programmers

#2 Olegvin  Icon User is offline

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Re: Question to pro programmers

Posted 10 May 2016 - 04:28 AM

I'm no pr0 programmer, but to answer your question it is possible, maybe it's harder but it is possible. My friend was in similar situation and so am I, I'm a mechanical engineer who decided to switch sides, loved everything about robot programing and WEB developing back in the day but it didn't open my eyes, now after working in my current field I realized that it's just not it.
Anyways I'm nowhere near to be in the IT industry right now, but what my friend did was develop a very impressive website and few other little projects, and basically used it to get into web developing, now working in global organization doing what he likes.

He is practical mechanical engineer.
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#3 DarenR  Icon User is offline

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Re: Question to pro programmers

Posted 10 May 2016 - 04:54 AM

depends who you know and what you know
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#4 no2pencil  Icon User is offline

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Re: Question to pro programmers

Posted 10 May 2016 - 06:04 AM

View Post626262, on 10 May 2016 - 05:16 AM, said:

My main question is it possible for a self-taught guy get into IT industry?

Yes, but it is growing increasingly more difficult to find companies not hung up on prerequisite.

View Post626262, on 10 May 2016 - 05:16 AM, said:

Also I learn on my own pretty good and I am a fast learner.

Understand the difference between self-taught & learn on the job, The answer to the previous question is dramatically changed when you mention "fast learner". Because any fast learner should have no problem testing out of college courses, & graduating early.

Lastly, understand that just because you did it for fun as a kid doesn't mean it's a fun carrier path.
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#5 modi123_1  Icon User is online

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Re: Question to pro programmers

Posted 10 May 2016 - 06:22 AM

Is no one interested in what this current studies are that have lost their luster?! I know I do!

Quote

But I found out that I do not want to do anything related with my current studies.

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#6 astonecipher  Icon User is offline

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Re: Question to pro programmers

Posted 10 May 2016 - 07:22 AM

Yes it is possible, no it isn't easy.

What are your current studies? I have done a lot in my lifetime and that is seen as a strength to the companies I have worked with/ for. Just because you have no interest in pursuing them directly, that doesn't mean they should be brushed off. Case in point, I have a degree in the medical field. I am not in the medical field per say, but am in the medical technology area now. Because I understand the medical side of things, I am a benefit to my company because I understand the nomenclature, processes, and procedures. Don't brush off what you have learned, because you don't find it useful now. You never know when it might benefit you later.

I would advise staying in the field you dedicated the time to, while learning programming. When you are ready to make the jump, you can go to the tech side of that industry, and yes every industry has a tech side of it.
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#7 NeoTifa  Icon User is offline

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Re: Question to pro programmers

Posted 10 May 2016 - 07:58 AM

A lot of people at my job have jobs there with either no degree or degrees in unrelated fields. My old test lead was an environmental studies major. Usually they're testers though. Once you get your foot in the door testing you can eventually move to dev usually.
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#8 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is offline

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Re: Question to pro programmers

Posted 10 May 2016 - 08:32 AM

Quote

Because if I would get a small job at least something related with programming such as SQL, then I would start gradually improving my knowledge by learning other stuff such as php, C++ or whatever I will be attracted to.


Everybody wants you to learn on the job - this is basic to working in tech. However, that doesn't mean you learn your current job on the job. You acquire the skills for your next job while you're working this job (and on the last three or so).

Since you're in school, and you're meant to be learning stuff, I would suggest that you try to find an internship through your school that looks interesting, and try to get that internship. You might or might not get it, but the main thing you want to learn from this is what the employer is looking for. That will give you a really good idea of what you need to be doing to be ready for a similar position, the next time one comes across your path.
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#9 ndc85430  Icon User is online

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Re: Question to pro programmers

Posted 10 May 2016 - 12:38 PM

What you may also want to do is to find out what's happening in tech in your area, via, e.g. meetup.com or something. Here in London, for example, there are a number of groups and intensive courses for people to gain such skills. Some are free, some cost money and some are only available to minorities in the tech industry (e.g. women or LGBTQ people). Certainly, I know of people here who have gone on to be developers after attending such things and self teaching. It's also encouraging that one of our newspapers recently started a fellowship programme and I believe the entry criteria are some basic knowledge of programming. I do wonder if such opportunities exist in other cities!
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#10 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is offline

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Re: Question to pro programmers

Posted 10 May 2016 - 12:49 PM

Meetups and users groups are a great thing - particularly since this is a group self-selected for sociability, so they're likely to be both knowledgeable and helpful.
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#11 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: Question to pro programmers

Posted 11 May 2016 - 05:02 AM

Yes it's possible to have a good career as a software developer even without a degree. I'm living proof of that.
But its hard to break in without something to show the people interviewing you. You'll need to have a good portfolio of work to back up your claims. So you should consider making programs to impress prospective employers. Humor goes a long way if you don't over do it. Make a web site for time-sharing your dog house as a vacation retreat, along with on-line reservation system and a companion mobile app. Or some other such thing that shows you can make a program, design a full system, integrate it with a website etc. etc.

Since you don't have a degree to wedge you're foot in the door you have to find some way to make up for that.
  • Dress like a professional. Seem confident.
  • Don't dwell on how you seem lost in the world and have no idea what you want to do with your life.
  • My personal pet peeve is writing. Be sure to write like a professional or at least like the college graduate you claim to be, and not as we see in your initial post here.If it all reads on an 8th grade level or like English is not your native language, you're in trouble.
  • Realize that employers will scour through your social media, so clean that up. If it is all about hacking and anarchy you're in trouble.
  • If your credit is in trouble, so are you - because now days they pull that to see if you are a candidate for competitor espionage, or just plain stealing from the company.
  • Show a good work ethic. That means showing up 20 minutes before shift (not 2) and pack up AFTER your shift ends not 10 minutes before so you can race out the door.

In short the people hiring you are 40-50 years old, not 20-somethings like yourself. You have to play to your audience. Show them what they want and need in a new hire from their perspective, not just yours.
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#12 baavgai  Icon User is offline

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Re: Question to pro programmers

Posted 11 May 2016 - 05:22 AM

My personal career path is as follows: Go to uni undeclared. Go liberal arts, because honestly a degree is just a degree. Get a BS in English lit. with a minor of Computer Science. ( Just a handful of creds away from minors in philosophy and journalism; liberal arts is fun. ) Work as an "administrative assistant" at an IT consulting firm, with the understanding of field experience. Get poached by a client who wants me full time. Work for 20+ years as DBA and developer.

While programmer is a pretty specific gig, IT peon is not. I know a legion of professional programmers who's history starts out with degrees in psychology, accounting, business admin, etc. The "not invented here" syndrome is alive and well. Many folks find themselves moving from doing in house Excel macros to intranet apps before they know what hit them.

The trick is being hired by anybody. A programmer farm isn't interested in the individual with programming pretensions. However, most departments in larger companies love the guy who can figure out the tech. If your first job isn't a programming job, but you can put "wrote custom inventory system" on your resume for next job, you're off and running.
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#13 PreciousReed  Icon User is offline

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Re: Question to pro programmers

Posted 10 June 2016 - 11:18 AM

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Please, any opinion matters, I really do want to get rid of my current specialization. Maybe you have any tips or thoughts?


Just follow your heart. It's not too late yet ti shift for an IT course and learn more in the field. However, you need to be hardworking and persistent to learn more. IT is a vast field from networking solutions, server administration, web development, web design, and so on. Which field you want to major?

Sure you can have your self study. There are a lot of free tutorials online and demo videos on Youtube. However, what you learn from free tutorials varies a lot when it compares to classes both school and online. I learn a lot from classes.
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