4 Replies - 2763 Views - Last Post: 01 October 2017 - 09:26 AM

#1 mcnillis  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 0
  • View blog
  • Posts: 3
  • Joined: 30-September 17

Java & C# Industry Standard Training

Posted 30 September 2017 - 03:19 AM

Hi, am new here.

I am currently a Design Engineer, recently graduated, but would like to learn and move my career to java and C# development.

What is the best way? What are the best industry standard developer courses to break into the field?

Would have to be part time as have to work full time supporting a family.

Thank you!
Is This A Good Question/Topic? 0
  • +

Replies To: Java & C# Industry Standard Training

#2 mcnillis  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 0
  • View blog
  • Posts: 3
  • Joined: 30-September 17

Re: Java & C# Industry Standard Training

Posted 30 September 2017 - 03:41 AM

Hi, also, I'm selling my car to pay for any courses. I know this sounds crazy, but I want to do a fairly expensive course (3-4k),i know my self and can only break through the painful barriers of understanding when there is a lot at steak!
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#3 macosxnerd101  Icon User is online

  • Games, Graphs, and Auctions
  • member icon




Reputation: 12134
  • View blog
  • Posts: 45,114
  • Joined: 27-December 08

Re: Java & C# Industry Standard Training

Posted 30 September 2017 - 07:44 PM

Moved to the Corner Cubicle.

Frankly, a 6-week or so training course in a given language is really for folks that know how to program well. And honestly, anyone that knows how to program well wouldn't be attending such a course. Similarly, Coding Bootcamps that promise to get you industry ready in a given timeframe are scams.

Programming is a skill that takes a solid year to develop to the point where you can be productive. The equivalents of Intro to Programming and Data Structures I (both taught using the same programming language) represent a minimum working effort to learn how to program. They provide you with enough foundation so that you can learn new frameworks and work on non-trivial projects by yourself. It might be more prudent to find a local community college and take the courses there. A course in discrete mathematics would also be helpful to develop your problem solving abilities.

One advantage of being a student is that you can take advantage of the career center at your institution. Companies frequently hire student interns, which is really how students break into the industry. After an internship or two, it's usually easier to get a job as a junior-level software engineer.

This post has been edited by macosxnerd101: 30 September 2017 - 07:45 PM

Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#4 mcnillis  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 0
  • View blog
  • Posts: 3
  • Joined: 30-September 17

Re: Java & C# Industry Standard Training

Posted 01 October 2017 - 04:11 AM

View Postmacosxnerd101, on 30 September 2017 - 07:44 PM, said:

Moved to the Corner Cubicle.

Frankly, a 6-week or so training course in a given language is really for folks that know how to program well. And honestly, anyone that knows how to program well wouldn't be attending such a course. Similarly, Coding Bootcamps that promise to get you industry ready in a given timeframe are scams.

Programming is a skill that takes a solid year to develop to the point where you can be productive. The equivalents of Intro to Programming and Data Structures I (both taught using the same programming language) represent a minimum working effort to learn how to program. They provide you with enough foundation so that you can learn new frameworks and work on non-trivial projects by yourself. It might be more prudent to find a local community college and take the courses there. A course in discrete mathematics would also be helpful to develop your problem solving abilities.

One advantage of being a student is that you can take advantage of the career center at your institution. Companies frequently hire student interns, which is really how students break into the industry. After an internship or two, it's usually easier to get a job as a junior-level software engineer.


Hi, thanks for your reply.

I don't disagree with you about the 12 week courses, I have an HND and a BSc in Mechanical Engineering which took me 6 years and have been working as a Design Engineer for close to a year. So I know what it takes to learn stuff! Plus, plenty of ridiculous maths in my studies. I expect it to take a solid year to learn the foundations, then the rest of my life to build on that.

So, given my technical/problem solving qualifications and job that I already have, I guess I was looking for a fairly aggressive rout into industry. If it takes me too long, my pay will keep going up in engineering, then have to take a difficult to justify pay cut.

There is so much stuff online, that's why I wanted advise from people in the field.

I had heard that given my current qualifications, an industry standard course/s could be the best way for me to become employable? I would like to avoid going to college.

Thanks.

This post has been edited by macosxnerd101: 01 October 2017 - 09:05 AM
Reason for edit:: Removed double post

Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#5 macosxnerd101  Icon User is online

  • Games, Graphs, and Auctions
  • member icon




Reputation: 12134
  • View blog
  • Posts: 45,114
  • Joined: 27-December 08

Re: Java & C# Industry Standard Training

Posted 01 October 2017 - 09:26 AM

Quote

So, given my technical/problem solving qualifications and job that I already have, I guess I was looking for a fairly aggressive rout into industry.


Changing jobs in the next three months probably isn't realistic. Though if you're already an engineer, it might be worth talking with your coworkers about picking up the skill. Maybe as you develop your skills enough, your coworkers can give you some small projects at work. I also want to note that algorithmic problem solving is very different from being a mechanical engineer.


Quote

an industry standard course/s could be the best way for me to become employable? I would like to avoid going to college.


An industry standard course is for people who know how to program to learn new technologies. It is not a place to learn how to program. I'm not suggesting go back for another degree. You really want some courses to help you learn to program, as well as problem solve in an algorithmic manner.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

Page 1 of 1