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Dual Boot Linux on a MacBook Rate Topic: -----

#1 GWatt  Icon User is offline

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Posted 24 February 2008 - 02:24 PM

To dual boot linux on a macbook you will need a linux disk that has hfs+ kernel modules and the ability to read GPT partition maps. Any distro with gparted, or qtparted will support this. The ones I used were Fedora and Kubuntu.
You should also get rEFIt boot loader. You don’t really need it, but it neatens the process. To do the automatic install, just run the mpkg file inside the dmg, which you can download here. If you don’t want the auto install, you can copy the “efi” folder from the dmg to your root directory. Then, you just run this command:
/efi/refit/enable.sh
to have the rEFIt boot menu the next time you start up. If you want to always have rEFIt show up on startup, use the command:
/efi/refit/enable-always.sh The next time you update the Mac OS kernel, this will erase the rEFIt boot menu. Just run the command again to reinstall it.
You also need to resize your current partition. Luckily, resizing a live partition is really easy under OS X. Open up “Disk Utility.app” which you can find in “/Applications/Utilities”
Select the hard drive, and then go over to the “Partition” tab. At this point your window should look something like this:
Attached Image
At the bottom of the partition labeled “Macintosh HD” there’s a handle. Click and drag the handle up until you’ve shrunk the Macintosh partition by about 10-20GB. Click apply, and wait until the partition is finished resizing. Stick your Linux CD in, and reboot.
If you opted to install rEFIt, that boot menu will pop up and will give you the option of booting from your Macintosh partition, or the Linux CD. If you haven’t installed rEFIt, either hold down the ‘c’ key to boot from the CD, or the ‘b’ key to bring up the Apple boot menu.
When you’re installing, you will probably not want to delete the Mac partition, so be careful. If you use Fedora or an Ubuntu variant, make sure you select the “install to free space option.” Ubuntu will take the entire drive by default, so be careful. If for some reason the Mac partition doesn’t show up, load the hfsplus kernel module with the command:
modprobe hfsplus
If you want to use the alternative ubuntu install disk, you will need to run that command. The normal desktop install works just fine.
There are a number of issues after you have linux installed. I could never get the wifi to work, or the iSight camera and microphone. There are tutorials to do that on the internet, but none of them worked for me. The built in ethernet works just fine, and I could get sound working. If you want to get wifi, people say that the madwifi modules work well. Getting the iSight working involves extracting something from the Mac driver. There are tutorials floating around on the internet, but I’ve never gotten them to work.
SOUND:
The MacBook uses an Intel ACH7 chipset. The driver for this is snd-intel8x0. Fedora did not detect this properly, but Ubuntu worked just fine. To change the sound driver, edit the file “/etc/modprobe.conf” There’s a line in there that starts with
alias snd-card-0
and there’s some kernel module following it. delete the last part and add “intel-8x0” so your line looks like this:
alias snd-card-0 intel-8x0
You should reboot your system after that, or reload all of your kernel modules pertaining to sound.
If you would also like to watch DVDs on your linux installation, install a media player that supports DVDs. I like Xine. The KDE xinelib based player is Kaffeine, and for Gnome you should grab GXine. You will also need the packages libdvdnav, libdvdplay, libdvdread, and libdvdcss. That should allow you to watch dvds on your system. On Fedora, I’ve found that SELinux causes problems for DVD playback, so tunring that off might help. If you are still having trouble, look around for a package called xinelibnonfree, or libxinenonfree. The various distros have different naming schemes, so it will be called something different on each Linux distro you run.
Most people would also like to their multi-touch trackpad. There is a touchpad driver called “synaptics” Install that. There are GUI programs to configure the options for synaptics, and those are all relatively easy to use. For KDE you can use Qsynaptics and Gnome users can use Gsynaptics. Through these programs you can configure your left/right/middle clicks. That’s right you can one-up Apple and configure a three finger tap to act like clicking the scroll wheel of the mouse. You can also have two finger scrolling, both vertical and horizontal.
I’m not going to go over configuring the touchpad manually through a text editor, because that’s completely unnecessary. You have the graphical tools readily available to you.
If you do want to do text configuration, I will direct you here:
http://www.tctwest.n...fig-4.synaptics

If there’s something you think I’ve left out that’s specific to MacBooks, please let me know.

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Replies To: Dual Boot Linux on a MacBook

#2 GWatt  Icon User is offline

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 07:15 AM

Sorry I messed something up and i can't edit the tutorial, so I'm posting a fix here.

I said that pressing the 'b' key brought up a boot menu. It is in fact the <alt> key that brings up a boot menu. The 'b' key doesn't do anything.
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