5 Replies - 858 Views - Last Post: 30 May 2008 - 12:32 PM

#1 Tastybrownies  Icon User is offline

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This may be a stupid question

Post icon  Posted 29 May 2008 - 09:01 PM

Well hello how is everyone doing today? The title of my post says it all, the question may be a little stupid to ask but I'm a student so I'll ask it anyway.

My future goals include getting into programming and software and I was just wondering with all the different languages I'm going to be learning, "Do I also need my A+ certification?" And since most of you on this website have had a lot of real life experience in getting programming jobs, etc. you guys could probably answer this question pretty easily.

What does everyone think? And if the answer is "yes" do you put it on your resume or not? I did a little looking at the other resume thread on the boards and didn't see it on there. Is that because you don't need it or you just didn't put it on there because it's not super important in programming?

Hopefully someone can answer these questions, thanks everyone.

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Replies To: This may be a stupid question

#2 no2pencil  Icon User is offline

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Re: This may be a stupid question

Posted 29 May 2008 - 09:06 PM

Need? No. Not in a million years.

Especially since A+ only covers basic computer fundamentals. If your career is in software development (programming), then it's irrelevant. It's like bringing in Merrit badges from Boy scouts.

Now... with that being said. What if you & some guy with similar skills & background applies for the job? You have A+ cert & he does not. Going into an interview, you want every advantage possible. An A+ cert will show that you took the time, & desire to better yourself at your cost of money & time. It shows you are serious.

Put it on your resume? Yes. But don't stop there. Build a portfolio. Show them many accomplishments. Get Network+ certified. Get any certifications that you can. You don't just want to show that you are qualified for the job. You want to show them you are the best candidate for the job, & they should want to hire you.
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#3 MarkoDaGeek  Icon User is offline

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Re: This may be a stupid question

Posted 29 May 2008 - 09:20 PM

I agree, I think if you took the time to obtain an A+ Certification, even if it's irrelevant to the position you are applying for, it's still technology focused and it shows you possess basic qualifications in that area.

There are some very stupid HR people out there, and they scan resumes for buzzwords like that, something irrelevant could be what get's you in for an interview over the other guy.
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#4 Programmist  Icon User is offline

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Re: This may be a stupid question

Posted 30 May 2008 - 05:16 AM

I have to agree and disagree with the respondents so far. I agree that the A+ cert is pretty much irrelevant to a programming job. I disagree, however, that it would separate you from the pack. If you want to get a cert, get certified in a language or two. Or get a basic and advanced cert in one language. It won't hurt you to have some knowledge of basic computer architecture and operating systems, but the A+ exam is so basic that it will really do you little good, unless you plan to go into a help desk support role. If you want to understand computer architecture from a level that would be useful to a programmer, look into a course that teaches from this book (or just read it yourself). You won't get any letters after your name, but you will know a hell of a lot more about computers than some shmo with "A+."

This post has been edited by Programmist: 30 May 2008 - 05:19 AM

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#5 NickDMax  Icon User is offline

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Re: This may be a stupid question

Posted 30 May 2008 - 08:27 AM

I find that the computer industry is very niche oriented. You will find that for various market corners there are sets of skills which distinguish someone from within that little corner of the industry.

So you really want to target those HR people. Research the area you are interested in work in. Go to Monster or Dice and look at job postings for a particular area and start picking out requirements. You will find that a general set is common. Work on those skills.

So, as we have said time and again in posts about various certifications:

Yes they can be helpful to you in growing in knowledge and confidence. -- good thing

Yes sometimes they can catch the eye of an HR person but not as much as a buzzword particular to that niche.

If you are coming out of college (i.e. are looking for internships or your first job out of school) than you may find such certifications far more helpful than I, no2pencil, Marco, or Programmist would. The reason being is that your main competitors are other students whose resumes look just as blank as yours.

But lest face it. As silly as it sounds the rather meaningless words "Experience in ASP.Net" would probably be more helpful than "A+ certified" . You "experience" could be shelving boxes and Best Buy but the HR people would pick up on those words (course when you went in for a technical interview they would probably notice but still).
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#6 Tastybrownies  Icon User is offline

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Re: This may be a stupid question

Posted 30 May 2008 - 12:32 PM

Thanks for all of the quick replies guys, I appreciate it very much. I agree with what most of you are saying, it is a good thing to have a general certificaion such as the A+ but it is not always necessary for the particular line of work you're geared towards.

Just as someone mentioned above, it would be better to hone your skills on your anticipated job rather than something else. In other words, get certificates that apply to what you do but another certificate that's not required showed that you went above and beyond.

I agree, it's better to be overqualified than under.
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