Full Sail University

Good or Bad idea?

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12 Replies - 2202 Views - Last Post: 10 September 2008 - 04:34 PM

#1 Psionics  Icon User is offline

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Full Sail University

Posted 10 September 2008 - 03:25 PM

Hey all! Just thought I'd get the user's here at [/dic] opinions on how Full Sail runs their programs. For those of you that don't know, Full Sail University is dubbed "Real World Education". We go to school about 40 hours/week, taking 2 classes/month. This translates into an entire semester being taught in about 8 classes on average.

My first programming class I'm taking right now as gone through all the basics of C++ up to arrays....in 2 classes lol. It's ridiculously fast and very in-depth. I was just wondering what the very experienced programmers here thought about that methodology...

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Replies To: Full Sail University

#2 KYA  Icon User is offline

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Re: Full Sail University

Posted 10 September 2008 - 03:36 PM

I vote no. But I suppose it depends on what you want to do.
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#3 WolfCoder  Icon User is offline

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Re: Full Sail University

Posted 10 September 2008 - 03:37 PM

I've personally taught myself programming, and because the TA in my lab can't speak English very clearly it looks like this continues. Even if you're taking a class in programming I recommend you try doing things on your own, things that aren't covered in class so that you can see how useful everything is.

This post has been edited by WolfCoder: 10 September 2008 - 03:38 PM

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#4 Martyr2  Icon User is offline

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Re: Full Sail University

Posted 10 September 2008 - 03:38 PM

Well I can't say what is good about that school but the idea that they are teaching at such a neckbreak pace is a bit alarming. You see, you can learn the syntax rather quickly for languages but it is the problem solving portion that takes more time. I am afraid that a program like that would teach you how to use an array for a bubble sort and then move on. What about other sorts? What about memory management for arrays? What about using an array for a queue or stack and which would be the best in which situation.

Sometimes students just need the time to work through the problems and bugs they encounter as they learn. I just hope they are not teaching the syntax and that is pretty much it. A gloss over is good for professional programmers who know the underlying theory but for someone who is brand new programming it is going to lead to a bunch of people who call themselves programmers but have no clue how to solve problems. Which all of us experienced programmers already know is becoming an increasing problem in the industry.

I know that isn't a direct answer to your question, but I just wanted you to be aware of that when you do your evaluation of the program. It is important to have a good balance of the theory as well as time to work with everything you are learning than just to gloss over the terms and move on. :)
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#5 WolfCoder  Icon User is offline

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Re: Full Sail University

Posted 10 September 2008 - 03:40 PM

View PostMartyr2, on 10 Sep, 2008 - 04:38 PM, said:

...
It is important to have a good balance of the theory
...


That's why my school made Foundations of Computer Science (Discrete Mathematics) mandatory^^
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#6 mocker  Icon User is offline

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Re: Full Sail University

Posted 10 September 2008 - 03:44 PM

Full Sail is like a trade school. It provides some training into very specific areas and doesn't do anything for other areas. Maybe that appeals to you, however I would not suggest it compares to the education you'd walk away with from a decent 4year program.

With programming if you know the fundamentals and how your source code turns into an actual program, things like syntax and the specific language don't matter so much. With a program like Full Sail, they are rushing you through WHAT to type. I'd hire someone who didn't know the specific language but had a good cs grounding over someone who's only expertise was the syntax of a specific language.

If a regular cs program isn't an option though, Full Sail will still give you some useful skills. I just hate them trying to act like its the same depth.
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#7 KYA  Icon User is offline

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Re: Full Sail University

Posted 10 September 2008 - 03:44 PM

A good ol' CS degree is still a good option, assuming you are of the programming persuasion.
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#8 Martyr2  Icon User is offline

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Re: Full Sail University

Posted 10 September 2008 - 03:49 PM

View PostWolfCoder, on 10 Sep, 2008 - 03:40 PM, said:

View PostMartyr2, on 10 Sep, 2008 - 04:38 PM, said:

...
It is important to have a good balance of the theory
...


That's why my school made Foundations of Computer Science (Discrete Mathematics) mandatory^^



Good to see that some institutions are still teaching the theory. I can't believe how many so called "programmers" I have run into that can't program a basic login script or solve a simple problem proposed by their current employer.

One time I took a job at a software company where I went to one of the senior programmers on the project and said "I see you created a user defined type here..." and then proceeded to ask a question about it. She was like "A user defined what?" and I looked at her puzzled and said "You mean the user defined type?" and here she programmed it and didn't even know that is what it was called.

:blink:
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#9 WolfCoder  Icon User is offline

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Re: Full Sail University

Posted 10 September 2008 - 03:57 PM

My supervisor at work asked me if I could do a web page to help publish a few articles when I met him while walking down one of the halls. At that time I had HTML in the back of my head, and didn't know CSS or PHP. I was able to learn what I need in 2 days and made a good web page~

I think the ability to quickly learn new things and apply theory like that is very valuable as a computer scientist. This way the code practically flows out from your fingertips even in a language you learned yesterday.
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#10 Psionics  Icon User is offline

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Re: Full Sail University

Posted 10 September 2008 - 04:08 PM

Yes it's extremely fast paced, and generally geared toward one specific thing..and as far as programming goes, it's only specific towards Game Development (what I'm in).

I took a regular CS class at the Cleveland State and so far, we've gone over the exact same topics, both 'how-to' and theory.

The basic breakdown works like this: we go to lecture for 4 hours, and then come back and do a lab for 4 hours, working through different problem solving skills and implementing what we've learned throughout that lecture.

Surprisingly, it is NOT a trade school. For starters, you graduate with a full Bachelor's or Master's, thus by definition it isn't a trade school. Secondly, practically 1/2 of the last graduating class last month got hired not to game companies, but places like NASA, the CIA, and several to Disney/Universal.

I don't mind the fast paced environment, but as many of you said, I'm just afraid I'm going to miss something...so everyday I just go through the C++ forums and see what people are writing...I think that's a good idea? What else could I do?
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#11 gabehabe  Icon User is offline

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Re: Full Sail University

Posted 10 September 2008 - 04:29 PM

Moved to the corner cube.
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#12 mocker  Icon User is offline

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Re: Full Sail University

Posted 10 September 2008 - 04:31 PM

Yes it is not a trade school, which is why I used "like" to describe it as similar, which it is. Trade schools focus on one specific field and 'trade' and do not cover anything else. Really the only difference I see is Full Sail somehow hands out regular degrees.

I'd suggest browsing some cs textbooks, or checking things like the MIT lectures to get some of the topics you might miss. The forum tend to be biased toward specific code based problems.

I'm not sure how much if any math full sail teaches, but you should definitely have a good base in it, and get discrete mathematics. Most of the CS programs I've seen do only about a semester or two less of math, than math majors do.
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#13 Psionics  Icon User is offline

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Re: Full Sail University

Posted 10 September 2008 - 04:34 PM

The only difference between trade-schools and degree programs are the non-core classes (like mathematics/psychology/physics) blah blah blah lol

And yes, they make us do math....lots of math lol you have to know algebra/trig just to get into the school, which is followed by Calculus, Linear Algebra (gulp!) physics, and a couple others down the road.
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