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#1 hockey97  Icon User is offline

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NSP...ISP? NEED SOME HELP TO HOST MY OWN SERVER.

Post icon  Posted 08 November 2008 - 12:38 PM

Ok, I talked to my telephone company well my dads.

we pay 50 bucks a month on wow broadband internet and they have policies against running a server on their line.

So my telephone just got up a new dsl system. They offer 50 bucks a month for a dedicated dsl line both a syn and the other syn.

I talked to the sales rep they didn't know the tech stuff so they told me call this number it was their tech specialist.

I asked them I am planning to host my own server. They said that they have no policies against running servers and they said that there is no limit on bandwidth.

So I want to switch to them. I talked with my dad and he said sounds good but he wants me to finish making my website before we switch.


I would like to know what does a server need to make sure my websites are not effected by poor performance from the server.


I am currently having a interview with a company to work as a php programmer. I plan to save up and then build my own server.

I also want to know who I can extend hard drives for a server or a computer ect.

I have seen google and yahoo facilites that showed cabenits that have robotic arms in them that would attach hard drives when called for.

Is there any way where I can have one computer that would be wonnected to all hard drives. Lets say If I get 156 hard drives al 500gb.

What could I do to connect all that in one???

I notice alto of big websites really do that alot of memory to store alot of stuff.

just look at myspace .


So I would like to know what I need to have for my server in order to keep my website running.



I know backup generators, ram, cpu, and gpu, and hard drives are important for a server.


I plan to build my own backup generator when I save up and start building my own server.

I currently use one computer but I have 2 comptuers. I plan to put linux on the 2nd one and us it as a backup server.

thanks for your times.


I also talked to a NSP that gives networks to google and yahoo called cogent but they are very expensive.

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Replies To: NSP...ISP? NEED SOME HELP TO HOST MY OWN SERVER.

#2 Martyr2  Icon User is offline

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Re: NSP...ISP? NEED SOME HELP TO HOST MY OWN SERVER.

Posted 08 November 2008 - 02:16 PM

Well first... the fact that you are going to be on a DSL line isn't the best way to run a high uptime high performance server because you not only need unlimited bandwidth but you need really good high speed bandwidth.

But for your first server a DSL would be just fine... just don't expect it to be high performance all the time.

Second you are going to need a mix of good software and hardware. I recommend running your primary server using linux if you can, but you can also create a windows server.

Next you will need software that tells the computer to serve HTML pages and files. This is called http or web server software. You might have heard of IIS for windows or Apache for Linux systems. These software items essentially listen for incoming connections from others, determine who sees what, fetches the documents requested and sends it back to the user.

Then the hardware you should have a very good CPU and motherboard. I recommend a Xeon chip if you can, or any other multicore processor will work fine these days. The motherboard should have a very good "Front side bus". This is the connection between the processor and the RAM and ideally you would want something like 1333 hz. For RAM you will want top grade and I recommend at least 3-4 Gigs of Ram. If you are running a windows server that is 32bit, you will be limited at 4 Gigs but I find this more than adequate.

As for hard drives, you will want high speed drives (Typically SATA or SAS drives) and you will want them in a RAID configuration. This makes the drives linked together and act as one. This will allow the drives to be fault tolerant. So if you lose a hard drive, the others will take over and you can continue to operate until you get another drive to replace the one that went down. If budget is a concern here, I recommend a RAID level 1 setup (disk mirroring) but if you can get it the best I find is RAID 5 (disk striping with parity).

Last but not least you will want a good power supply and preferably a backup installed along side it. Then connect these to a power backup generator. What this will do is that if the power goes out, you have power from the generator, if one of your power supplies breaks, the other will take over so you can replace the broken one.

As for operating system you should probably get Windows Server 2003 R2 minimum and if you want you could go with a newer version. As for linux variants, you can try a vast array of distros... I can have a linux guru here tell you which they have experienced to be the best.

Just to give you an idea I manage two Dell poweredge servers at work, both have Windows server R2, 4 gigs ram, one is a dual core xeon and the other is a new quad core xeon. They have 1333 front side buses and each have 3 SATA drives in RAID 5 configurations. They also have redundant power supplies and look pretty crispy in the dark. We store them in a colocation cage at a hosted provider which is connected to several good backbone connections. I run over 180 worldwide websites and an intranet shared by about 13 regional offices. The average time I get is roughly 1 - 3 seconds per page because the code is pretty ancient and wasn't coded correctly (which I am in charge of also recoding).

If you want to know more about what makes a good server, cruise around the PC manufacturer websites and see what they are putting in their servers.

The rest is up to you. :)
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#3 hockey97  Icon User is offline

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Re: NSP...ISP? NEED SOME HELP TO HOST MY OWN SERVER.

Posted 09 November 2008 - 02:30 PM

View PostMartyr2, on 8 Nov, 2008 - 01:16 PM, said:

Well first... the fact that you are going to be on a DSL line isn't the best way to run a high uptime high performance server because you not only need unlimited bandwidth but you need really good high speed bandwidth.

But for your first server a DSL would be just fine... just don't expect it to be high performance all the time.

Second you are going to need a mix of good software and hardware. I recommend running your primary server using linux if you can, but you can also create a windows server.

Next you will need software that tells the computer to serve HTML pages and files. This is called http or web server software. You might have heard of IIS for windows or Apache for Linux systems. These software items essentially listen for incoming connections from others, determine who sees what, fetches the documents requested and sends it back to the user.

Then the hardware you should have a very good CPU and motherboard. I recommend a Xeon chip if you can, or any other multicore processor will work fine these days. The motherboard should have a very good "Front side bus". This is the connection between the processor and the RAM and ideally you would want something like 1333 hz. For RAM you will want top grade and I recommend at least 3-4 Gigs of Ram. If you are running a windows server that is 32bit, you will be limited at 4 Gigs but I find this more than adequate.

As for hard drives, you will want high speed drives (Typically SATA or SAS drives) and you will want them in a RAID configuration. This makes the drives linked together and act as one. This will allow the drives to be fault tolerant. So if you lose a hard drive, the others will take over and you can continue to operate until you get another drive to replace the one that went down. If budget is a concern here, I recommend a RAID level 1 setup (disk mirroring) but if you can get it the best I find is RAID 5 (disk striping with parity).

Last but not least you will want a good power supply and preferably a backup installed along side it. Then connect these to a power backup generator. What this will do is that if the power goes out, you have power from the generator, if one of your power supplies breaks, the other will take over so you can replace the broken one.

As for operating system you should probably get Windows Server 2003 R2 minimum and if you want you could go with a newer version. As for linux variants, you can try a vast array of distros... I can have a linux guru here tell you which they have experienced to be the best.

Just to give you an idea I manage two Dell poweredge servers at work, both have Windows server R2, 4 gigs ram, one is a dual core xeon and the other is a new quad core xeon. They have 1333 front side buses and each have 3 SATA drives in RAID 5 configurations. They also have redundant power supplies and look pretty crispy in the dark. We store them in a colocation cage at a hosted provider which is connected to several good backbone connections. I run over 180 worldwide websites and an intranet shared by about 13 regional offices. The average time I get is roughly 1 - 3 seconds per page because the code is pretty ancient and wasn't coded correctly (which I am in charge of also recoding).

If you want to know more about what makes a good server, cruise around the PC manufacturer websites and see what they are putting in their servers.

The rest is up to you. :)



Thanks for your reply. It was very informative.

I currently have linux ubuntu running a apche and I do have domain names bought already.

I just right now need a start. I plan to start with dsl. I have asked them about my sistuation they sent me to their internet engineer.

I asked my questions he said they can handle it.

My current ISP can't handel to load this is why they have policies against server software running on their network.

I have the server currently installed on my old compuer. I build a new computer from my highschool class.

I have a AM2 cpu socket so I can upgrade the cpu to a quad core. I also have only 4 slots of ram.

I was thinking maybe to fix up the new computer and just sell it. with that money I might just go out and start to build my own server.

I have talked to a network provider called cogent they also supply netowork to google and yahoo. Their prices are very expensive their cheapest deal is 1,000 bucks a month for 1mb of bandwitdh.

So right now I am just starting out and want to take it slow. I know I can't have top performance with a dsl but at least it's a start.

but thanks for your reply.

Do you have any im app?? just woundering.
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#4 no2pencil  Icon User is offline

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Re: NSP...ISP? NEED SOME HELP TO HOST MY OWN SERVER.

Posted 10 November 2008 - 12:23 PM

View Posthockey97, on 9 Nov, 2008 - 03:30 PM, said:

I asked my questions he said they can handle it.

Of course they can. & they'll probably charge you a penny & half for it as well.

View Posthockey97, on 9 Nov, 2008 - 03:30 PM, said:

My current ISP can't handel to load this is why they have policies against server software running on their network.

As long as you can recieve port 80 (& generally port 25 if you plan on running email) requests, then you are good to go.

View Posthockey97, on 9 Nov, 2008 - 03:30 PM, said:

I have talked to a network provider called cogent they also supply netowork to google and yahoo. Their prices are very expensive their cheapest deal is 1,000 bucks a month for 1mb of bandwitdh.

... network to Google & Yahoo? I don't understand what you mean. & for 1 grand per month, you would be better off just placing your server somewhere that offers renting rack space for a couple hundred bucks. You'd probably get close speeds as well.

View Posthockey97, on 9 Nov, 2008 - 03:30 PM, said:

Do you have any im app?? just woundering.

Please keep all conversation on the forums, as this will better help others who have similar questions.
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#5 mocker  Icon User is offline

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Re: NSP...ISP? NEED SOME HELP TO HOST MY OWN SERVER.

Posted 10 November 2008 - 02:20 PM

Cogent is a Tier 1 provider.. basically they run a lot of the lines that are the backbone connections for your ISP and many others. When you get into larger operations, or even smaller sized datacenters your price for bandwidth grows exponentially. For what is basically a hobbyist running their own server, Cogent and similar companies aren't even in the equation.

If you plan on getting serious with your server, you will eventually want to move it into a datacenter, or get a server already at one, but for now your dsl or any regular internet connection would work for you. It's not that your ISP can't handle running your one server (someone viewing youtube videos will probably eat more of their bandwidth than your server), its that if they have their policy to allow you to run a server, then they must allow others, and they have to pay for their bandwidth (to someone like Cogent), so they lose money if their users start serving a lot of traffic while paying for a cheapo line.

If you have an operation that requires a backup generator, than you are building your own datacenter, and a home internet connection will probably get pulled. I'm willing to bet you'd be violating something in their Terms of Service since you are basically abusing their connection.

Start small.. your own computer or a small server to mess with, and then if you want to expand it, be willing to pay for what you use.
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#6 BlueVD  Icon User is offline

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Re: NSP...ISP? NEED SOME HELP TO HOST MY OWN SERVER.

Posted 14 November 2008 - 06:02 AM

Well, when it comes to a server, for the first one, it can be pretty inexpensive.
I recommend a P4 (despite I'm an AMD supporter, P4 procs are more suited for homegrown servers) but even and Athlon or smaller proc can do the job. It should have at least 1GHz; 512 MB RAM will do just fine; And when it comes to HDD's, you should have atleast one at 7200 RPM's and with enough space on it (arround 5 GB for the linux OS, 2GB for swap, 1GB for logs, and the rest for webhosting);
About Hot Swappable HDD's (ones you can plug in while the operating system is running) they are expensive and hardware platforms that support them are also very pricey. You should worry about them later on.
Now, the software part:
You should chose a distro that you feel comfortable with. Personally, I recommend either Mandriva of Fedora Core; Open Suse is another good candidate. All 3 of them have easy to use config tools and are well tested and stable. One common pitfall for the first linux server you'll do is to install the UI (X windowing system); you sould not (and I stress not) install any graphical interface or if you do, when you're ready to turn on the server for good, remove or disable the graphical UI (run in init 3);
Now, for it to work as a webhosting server you will need at least the following software:
- Apache HTTPD : the server that actually serves the web pages; Easy to use, lots of docs and howto's;
- ISC BIND : the DNS server that will reply to domain name lookups; you'll need some help to configure it for the first time;
- ProFTPD / PureFTPD / VSFTPD : an ftp server so that clients can upload files easily; you need to figure out which one of them you'll use; all 3 have extensive functionality; ProFTPD has the advantage that is easy to set up with virtual and caged accounts using a MYSQL backend database for user authentication; common pitfalls for ProFTPD are bad config files that end up with possible security breaches; PureFTPD is considered to be very secured; also it can be set up to use virtual accounts; Its downfall however is the configuration which can be difficult for the first time; VSFTPD is well balanced but is know to have exploits from time to time; I personally don't use it and preffer the other 2;
- MySQL : the database server that your clients will store data in; Easy to config, actually, there's little optimization needed; It's usualy ready out of the box;
- Email server : here the list is huge; there are many smtp and pop3/imap servers for linux. The only advice I can give is that if you use sendmail, check, recheck, recheck and recheck the config files; it's hard to configure although it's the best choice; for the first time, I suggest you pick a different server, and when you're confident enough with linux and config files and the terminology, hit it...
- Some form of control panel for your customers: you'll need PHPMyAdmin and another control panel for your clients; There are some that are freeware/open source (webmin) and proprietary ones like CPanel or DirectAdmin;
You will find plenty of help on the net whatever combination you chose to use; if you go for Mandriva, you have the IRC channel help on the freenode servers (channel is #mandriva);
One last advice: don't chose ubuntu or ubuntu based distros as the OS for your server (rather pick the pure Debian instead;)
Good luck with your choices and the server!
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