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Ulead GIF Animator 5: How to make flying objects Rate Topic: -----

#1 OliveOyl3471  Icon User is offline

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 01:47 AM

How to make an object (or objects) coming toward you:

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Start with a blank animation. Open your UGA and right click anywhere on the canvas. Click new blank object (or use ctrl + alt + d).

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Use your fill tool to fill the canvas with your background color. Pick a color that will contrast well with your other object(s) that you will be using. For this tutorial, I am using simple black and white, but you can use any colors you like.

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Keep in mind that we are using perspective in this animation. Picture a long hallway, for example, with the general shape of this:

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Your moving objects will begin at the center and move outward toward you, in the direction of the arrows:

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Leave the first frame blank, except for your background, which will be object 1. Add a new frame.

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Highlight the background object, at the right. Object 14 is highlighted at the right, in this image:

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Go to Edit, Copy. Then paste your background into frame 2. If you have an object you would like to use, go to file, add image and find your image wherever you have it saved on your computer. Click on your image to highlight it. Make sure insert in the current frame is checked. Click open. Your image should now be in frame 2. You'll want to choose a fairly small image, to make it appear very far away before you begin moving it toward you.

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Alternatively, if you do not have a specific image you want to use, right click anywhere on the canvas and choose new blank object. Use the paintbrush tool to make a small speck in the middle of the picture.

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To center the object, highlight it at the right, then click the center tool as shown:

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Add a new frame. Each time you add a new frame, highlight your background, with the eye, so that it shows up in each frame. To keep the background from covering up your moving object, highlight the background object and go to Order. Choose the fourth arrow, which will send it to the background (underneath all the other objects, which is where we want it).

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Highlight the object that you will be moving (in frame 2). Go to edit and copy. Paste your object into frame 3. Adjust the size so that it is just a little bit bigger than it was in the previous frame. The amount you adjust it will depend on how big it was to begin with, and how big (width and height) your background is. Move the object a little. To move the object, right click on the object at the right, and choose object properties, position and size. Make sure the box marked keep aspect ratio is checked. Adjust the numbers according to how much you want to increase the size, and where you want to position your object.

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To make an object move diagonally, move the same number up and right (or down and right, etc). After you move the object left, right, up or down (not diagonally), go to Alignment. If you moved it up or down, center the object horizontally. If you moved the object right or left, center it vertically. If you moved the object diagonally, do not center it.

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Add a new frame. Copy/paste your object into the new frame (frame 4). Adjust the size and position, making it a little bigger and a little closer to the edge. Keep repeating this step until the object is very close to the edge. Make sure you keep your object going in a straight line toward the edge of your picture.

You can go through the steps again, and add other objects, so it looks like they are all coming at you. It looks better if you add them in different increments. If your first object starts in frame 1, you might want to add your next object in frame 3 or frame 4, and then start it moving toward the edge. Add frames as necessary to get each object very close to the edge (or even partially over the edge) before it disappears. Whenever one of the objects gets close enough to the edge, you are done with that object. Omit it in the next frames, and keep going with your new object(s).

Save mine and open it with your animation program. Look at the last frame. See how there is only one object in that frame, and it is very close to the edge. That means the next frame will contain one small object in the very center, which happens to be our first frame. This is a good place to end your animation, so that it will flow smoothly. You donít want to end it with a frame that has any objects somewhere in between the center and very close to the edge, because it will look choppy.

Adjust the timing. Click on the first frame. Hold down the shift key and click on the last frame. This will highlight all your frames. Right click any frame. Choose frame properties. Choose delay 12, and removal method smart.

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To keep objects from becoming distorted when you make them bigger, you could start out with big objects and work backward from the outside edge going toward the center, making the objects smaller as you go. Then just reverse the order when you are finished.

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