How to read all of the computer languages

Can someone please tell me how i can read all of the computer language

  • (2 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2

18 Replies - 17279 Views - Last Post: 02 January 2009 - 10:56 PM

#1 thesizzler7  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 0
  • View blog
  • Posts: 1
  • Joined: 18-December 08

How to read all of the computer languages

Posted 18 December 2008 - 10:42 PM

I want to learn how to read all computer codes (vb6, C++, java, perl ect...). Someone pleease help me :ph34r:
Is This A Good Question/Topic? 0
  • +

Replies To: How to read all of the computer languages

#2 jens  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Regular
  • member icon

Reputation: 67
  • View blog
  • Posts: 430
  • Joined: 09-May 08

Re: How to read all of the computer languages

Posted 19 December 2008 - 12:48 AM

I'd say that you'd have to start programming in each language you want to be able to read. Start with one of them and try to learn enough to do a few simple programs. When that is mastered you can try the next one or find yourself intrigued by programming and go deeper in the one you know.

Personally I like VB.NET and C# since they have video tutorials and lots of simple starting projects. Others will tell you other things but I'd suggest you started to learn C#.

But, maybe this is wrong way to go. First I should have asked why you want to learn to read them, what do you want to achive?

Regards
/Jens
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#3 no2pencil  Icon User is online

  • Admiral Fancy Pants
  • member icon

Reputation: 5379
  • View blog
  • Posts: 27,350
  • Joined: 10-May 07

Re: How to read all of the computer languages

Posted 19 December 2008 - 12:51 AM

View Postthesizzler7, on 18 Dec, 2008 - 11:42 PM, said:

Someone pleease help me :ph34r:

No one can help you learn how to do this. You'll simply have to learn them.

If you have a specific question... that's another story. But learning is simply learning.

My advice... all languages? Seriously? Why? Pick one, learn it, move on. Don't set your ceiling quite so high.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#4 Tom9729  Icon User is offline

  • Segmentation fault
  • member icon

Reputation: 180
  • View blog
  • Posts: 2,641
  • Joined: 30-December 07

Re: How to read all of the computer languages

Posted 19 December 2008 - 02:37 AM

Reading any language is easy (ok, any language except for Perl ;)).

Understanding what's going on is a lot harder, and isn't really possible unless you know how to write a little bit of that language anyways.

Pick one to start with. Once you learn it well, chances are you will be able to look at a bit of code written in any language and at least have a general idea of what it's doing. :)
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#5 Deathtrh  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 2
  • View blog
  • Posts: 18
  • Joined: 21-December 08

Re: How to read all of the computer languages

Posted 22 December 2008 - 03:50 AM

You cant just learn one language and then now all of them


most computer languages are totally different! :v: :v: :v: :v: :v: :v:
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#6 WushuMonster  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Head

Reputation: 13
  • View blog
  • Posts: 187
  • Joined: 29-February 08

Re: How to read all of the computer languages

Posted 22 December 2008 - 10:01 AM

Learn the basic concepts and logic, how to write pseudo code, etc. Then focus on learning and actual language, and build on that. While it's a little silly to set out to learn every single language, with solid basic training and understanding of what you're doing, you will be able recognize some things in other languages and understand some things based on what you know of programming.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#7 KYA  Icon User is offline

  • g++ jameson.cpp -o beverage
  • member icon

Reputation: 3116
  • View blog
  • Posts: 19,153
  • Joined: 14-September 07

Re: How to read all of the computer languages

Posted 22 December 2008 - 11:28 AM

View PostDeathtrh, on 22 Dec, 2008 - 03:50 AM, said:

You cant just learn one language and then now all of them


most computer languages are totally different! :v: :v: :v: :v: :v: :v:


You should be able to read all of them though. Syntax is basically the same regardless of language.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#8 Tom9729  Icon User is offline

  • Segmentation fault
  • member icon

Reputation: 180
  • View blog
  • Posts: 2,641
  • Joined: 30-December 07

Re: How to read all of the computer languages

Posted 22 December 2008 - 01:12 PM

View PostKYA, on 22 Dec, 2008 - 01:28 PM, said:

You should be able to read all of them though. Syntax is basically the same regardless of language.

Syntax is pretty much the only thing that changes between languages.

View PostDeathtrh, on 22 Dec, 2008 - 03:50 AM, said:

You cant just learn one language and then now all of them


most computer languages are totally different! :v: :v: :v: :v: :v: :v:

Not really. Two different programming languages may appear different but the concepts don't change. I'm not saying that one can learn one programming language, and then instantly know how to write in all of them. I am saying that once one knows one language, it is very easy to pickup others (and you should be able to read other languages and have a pretty good idea of what's going on).
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#9 Deathtrh  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 2
  • View blog
  • Posts: 18
  • Joined: 21-December 08

Re: How to read all of the computer languages

Posted 22 December 2008 - 11:00 PM

View PostTom9729, on 22 Dec, 2008 - 12:12 PM, said:

View PostKYA, on 22 Dec, 2008 - 01:28 PM, said:

You should be able to read all of them though. Syntax is basically the same regardless of language.

Syntax is pretty much the only thing that changes between languages.

View PostDeathtrh, on 22 Dec, 2008 - 03:50 AM, said:

You cant just learn one language and then now all of them


most computer languages are totally different! :v: :v: :v: :v: :v: :v:

Not really. Two different programming languages may appear different but the concepts don't change. I'm not saying that one can learn one programming language, and then instantly know how to write in all of them. I am saying that once one knows one language, it is very easy to pickup others (and you should be able to read other languages and have a pretty good idea of what's going on).



I KNOW THAT THE CONCEPTS DONT CHANGE BUT THE LANGUAGE IS STILL DIFFERENT IN ALOT OF WAYS.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#10 Core  Icon User is offline

  • using System.Linq;
  • member icon

Reputation: 774
  • View blog
  • Posts: 5,097
  • Joined: 08-December 08

Re: How to read all of the computer languages

Posted 22 December 2008 - 11:04 PM

Basically, the main difference is the syntax. The libraries available in one language are most likely available in another. Yes, some languages can do a better job to create a specific type of applications (for example, using Java you can create web applications easier than using C++), but theoretically there is no task that can be performed by a language, and can't be performed by another one.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#11 Deathtrh  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 2
  • View blog
  • Posts: 18
  • Joined: 21-December 08

Re: How to read all of the computer languages

Posted 22 December 2008 - 11:11 PM

View PostCore, on 22 Dec, 2008 - 10:04 PM, said:

Basically, the main difference is the syntax. The libraries available in one language are most likely available in another. Yes, some languages can do a better job to create a specific type of applications (for example, using Java you can create web applications easier than using C++), but theoretically there is no task that can be performed by a language, and can't be performed by another one.



thats exactly what i mean the syntax is different but the tools available are differnet

View PostDeathtrh, on 22 Dec, 2008 - 10:09 PM, said:

View PostCore, on 22 Dec, 2008 - 10:04 PM, said:

Basically, the main difference is the syntax. The libraries available in one language are most likely available in another. Yes, some languages can do a better job to create a specific type of applications (for example, using Java you can create web applications easier than using C++), but theoretically there is no task that can be performed by a language, and can't be performed by another one.



thats exactly what i mean the syntax is different but the tools available are differnet



whoops i meant to say that the tools available are NOT different
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#12 Core  Icon User is offline

  • using System.Linq;
  • member icon

Reputation: 774
  • View blog
  • Posts: 5,097
  • Joined: 08-December 08

Re: How to read all of the computer languages

Posted 22 December 2008 - 11:16 PM

I definitely can say that the available tools are different. And those are actually one of the defining factors for a language on a specific platform. For example, MonoDevelop doesn't have even a half of the features Visual Studio has for C# development, not to say about VB.NET. What about team development of a product in MonoDevelop (like Visual Studio Team System series)? Is this a deciding factor if the language will be actively used on a specific platform? Yes it is. The tools are very different.

This post has been edited by Core: 22 December 2008 - 11:18 PM

Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#13 Tom9729  Icon User is offline

  • Segmentation fault
  • member icon

Reputation: 180
  • View blog
  • Posts: 2,641
  • Joined: 30-December 07

Re: How to read all of the computer languages

Posted 22 December 2008 - 11:22 PM

View PostDeathtrh, on 23 Dec, 2008 - 01:00 AM, said:

I KNOW THAT THE CONCEPTS DONT CHANGE BUT THE LANGUAGE IS STILL DIFFERENT IN ALOT OF WAYS.

You could make the argument that there are some radically different languages out there (f.ex. Haskell) that might take someone, who for the sake of the argument knows C-like languages pretty well, a while to pickup. Languages like that don't seem to be very typical though.

Languages like Perl, C/C++, Python, or Java are all remarkably similar. If you know one well you should be able to pick up any of the others in a relatively short amount of time.

Edit: Edited about 15 times for clarity, I blame late nights...

This post has been edited by Tom9729: 22 December 2008 - 11:41 PM

Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#14 Tom9729  Icon User is offline

  • Segmentation fault
  • member icon

Reputation: 180
  • View blog
  • Posts: 2,641
  • Joined: 30-December 07

Re: How to read all of the computer languages

Posted 22 December 2008 - 11:38 PM

View PostCore, on 23 Dec, 2008 - 01:16 AM, said:

The tools are very different.

That really depends on what tools you use. If you pick the right ones, they don't have to be.

I do all of my programming in Emacs. Before that I used Eclipse. Why? Because when I wanted to do something in a different language, I wouldn't have to spend time getting used to a new program first.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#15 Core  Icon User is offline

  • using System.Linq;
  • member icon

Reputation: 774
  • View blog
  • Posts: 5,097
  • Joined: 08-December 08

Re: How to read all of the computer languages

Posted 22 December 2008 - 11:47 PM

I just presented the difference between MonoDevelop and Visual Studio. The biggest difference between tools is the set of features those offer. Even if the GUI can be similar, the number of features provided to accomplish a specific task (ex. team development) differs drastically.

This post has been edited by Core: 22 December 2008 - 11:50 PM

Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

  • (2 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2