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#1 General Adamus  Icon User is offline

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Mr. Database and Mrs. Application – The Wedding Vows

Post icon  Posted 05 February 2009 - 08:26 PM

Mr. Database To Mrs. Application

I do solemnly swear to love your validation. I will fully trust that you’re passing me the correct datatypes and the lengths will never cause overflow exceptions.
I do solemnly swear to honor your security. I will fully trust that you have encrypted all accounts in your config files and compensated for injection attacks so that my server is never vulnerable or compromised.
I do solemnly swear to cherish your procedural optimizations that only an OOP environment can provide.

Mrs. Application To Mr. Database

I do solemnly swear to love your set based environment. I will keep my procedural and conditional statements to myself so that you can focus on providing me with optimal results.
I do solemnly swear to honor your engine. I will study your execution plans and adjust my querys accordingly until all indexes are being applied, table and index scans are converted to seeks, and your estimated row counts are accurate.
I do solemnly swear to cherish your design by naturalizing my databases, properly choosing primary keys, create referential integrity, and forever search for new methods to avoid cursors.

Until Armageddon due us part!

Seriously folks. There is yet to be published a good critical thinking reference for the separation of programming roles. Yes you n-tier developers, you have defined layers but even with this strict design, much is left to be decided as to where the optimal adjustments should be made. Example 1: SQL Server can sort but carries a significant overhead to do so. OOP can also sort but will typically sort a smaller and more refined resultset. So should all sorting be done in OOP for performance reasons? Yes, yes, and almost always yes. Example 2: OOP can load and query large datatables in memory but SQL Server employs a query optimizer. Does that mean all querys should be run in the database engine and only return refined datasets? Yes, yes, and almost always yes.

While I could ramble on without endeavor, I would be interested to hear others thoughts on specifically ‘where’ the often applied methodologies might better benefit the overall designs through either relocation or redesign.

This post has been edited by General Adamus: 05 February 2009 - 08:27 PM


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Replies To: Mr. Database and Mrs. Application – The Wedding Vows

#2 Trogdor  Icon User is offline

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Re: Mr. Database and Mrs. Application – The Wedding Vows

Posted 06 February 2009 - 04:35 AM

Why that fixation with OOP ?
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#3 General Adamus  Icon User is offline

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Re: Mr. Database and Mrs. Application – The Wedding Vows

Posted 06 February 2009 - 05:30 AM

I could have used any language. It was for example only.
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#4 Trogdor  Icon User is offline

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Re: Mr. Database and Mrs. Application – The Wedding Vows

Posted 06 February 2009 - 10:52 AM

Indeed, replacing "OOP" with "any language" in your text makes it less specific and more to the point in my opinion.
The same goes for replacing "SQL Server" with "Your database".
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