What should I look for?

In a college, and courses towards my dream career?

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7 Replies - 878 Views - Last Post: 01 April 2009 - 01:57 AM

#1 Gagnerants  Icon User is offline

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What should I look for?

Posted 02 March 2009 - 08:55 PM

Ok, I'll give you a little background info about me. As of now I'm a college freshman, at the local community college. I am going to be majoring in computer science, with a focus towards System's Administration. So I'm wondering what sort of colleges would best towards my major/Career path. What sort of questions should I ask them, in general and towards my focus? My other question is, I noticed that back east they have a few university's that are public, and they offer Bachelor degree's as well as graduate level degree's as well. So What is the major difference between the private university's and the public ones?

Thank you in advance!

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#2 jjsaw5  Icon User is offline

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Re: What should I look for?

Posted 03 March 2009 - 06:05 AM

Private school are going to have smaller enrollment numbers as opposed to a public/state school.


Private schools can be a bit pricy so I would be careful if you are looking into something a long those lines.
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#3 NeoTifa  Icon User is offline

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Re: What should I look for?

Posted 04 March 2009 - 03:25 PM

Come to Ohio and go to WSU <3

What you should look for is a less diverse college.... so maybe WSU isn't a good choice :P No point in going to college only to realize that you paid $20,000 for some hobo to preach Swahili at you and mark your papers profusely in red ink and tell you that you're gonna fail. Bah! Find a college where the professors speak english. You also want to look at the kinds of programs they offer, and what kind of academic help centers they have. If you can look on rateyourprofessor.com (I think that's it) and see how easy they are, then go for it. If you've heard about the student body, then I would suggest one that isn't really a party school; the students are a lot nicer that way.
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#4 mostyfriedman  Icon User is offline

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Re: What should I look for?

Posted 05 March 2009 - 12:35 PM

View PostNeoTifa, on 4 Mar, 2009 - 02:25 PM, said:

Come to Ohio and go to WSU <3

What you should look for is a less diverse college.... so maybe WSU isn't a good choice :P No point in going to college only to realize that you paid $20,000 for some hobo to preach Swahili at you and mark your papers profusely in red ink and tell you that you're gonna fail. Bah! Find a college where the professors speak english. You also want to look at the kinds of programs they offer, and what kind of academic help centers they have. If you can look on rateyourprofessor.com (I think that's it) and see how easy they are, then go for it. If you've heard about the student body, then I would suggest one that isn't really a party school; the students are a lot nicer that way.

people speak swahili at wsu???? :P
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#5 NeoTifa  Icon User is offline

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Re: What should I look for?

Posted 05 March 2009 - 07:02 PM

They speak every language but English.
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#6 AdamSpeight2008  Icon User is online

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Re: What should I look for?

Posted 05 March 2009 - 07:08 PM

Quote

What should I look for?, In a college

The Bar, The Members of the opposite Sex and a good time.
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#7 zakmobl  Icon User is offline

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Re: What should I look for?

Posted 08 March 2009 - 09:52 AM

Generally colleges are different for different people. You could choose a tech school or a liberal arts. You should generally look at rankings of diferent schools and see what info you can find on there sites and more important than anything else is to visit the campuses.

Also , out of curiosity, why CS rather than IT if your going into system administration? It seems to me that the courses would be more applicable in that field.
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#8 TheBeege  Icon User is offline

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Re: What should I look for?

Posted 01 April 2009 - 01:57 AM

View PostGagnerants, on 2 Mar, 2009 - 07:55 PM, said:

Ok, I'll give you a little background info about me. As of now I'm a college freshman, at the local community college. I am going to be majoring in computer science, with a focus towards System's Administration. So I'm wondering what sort of colleges would best towards my major/Career path. What sort of questions should I ask them, in general and towards my focus? My other question is, I noticed that back east they have a few university's that are public, and they offer Bachelor degree's as well as graduate level degree's as well. So What is the major difference between the private university's and the public ones?

Thank you in advance!


I don't mean to be a dick, but you really need to work on your grammar if you're going to be applying to universities. Even if you're going into computer science, you still need to able to write. The apostrophe ( ' ) is used for possession. It is not used for plural forms of words. For example, "System's Administration" should be Systems Administration. Administration is not owned by systems. "Systems" is being used as an adjective to describe administration (What type of administration?). It refers to multiple systems, not a system possessing an administration. You do the same thing with "degree's".
Yes, you'll need to know these things when you write the documentation for any systems or applications you develop. Chances are that there will be programmers with the same level of expertise as you. Having an employee that can write their own technical reports is cheaper for an employer than hiring a second person to document an employee's work. These are the sorts of things that will help you get a job as opposed to the next guy. I know US education is terrible, but you need to learn how to communicate properly.

Enough of my rant on writing X-D Now on to your questions.

Look up rankings for the computer science departments of various universities. This may not be as easy as it sounds. I just attempted to find one as an example, but none of my Google results look to be very credible sources.
Ask them the average salary of their graduates within 6 months of graduating. Ask them what companies many of their graduates work for. Ask where some of their students go for their graduate studies. Ask for the contact info of a few current students or recent graduates so you can get a more in-depth view of the school's environment. Go to a few schools and take their tours. Be sure to wander around and approach students.

If you plan on attending graduate school, it doesn't matter quite as much where you acquired your undergraduate (Bachelor's) degree. As long as you make good enough grades, show leadership in extracurricular activities, make good test scores, etc. (it's like the high school thing all over again), you can go almost anywhere for grad school. Obviously, it's easier if you went to a better school for your undergrad, but it's not a huge deal. Schools that you can get both your undergraduate and graduate degrees in may be more willing to accept you into the grad school portion, but other than that, there's no huge difference between schools that have both undergrad and grad schools.

Public universities are subsidized by the state government of their respective state. This means that students attending a school within their state of residency pay less tuition than a student attending from a different state. For example, I pay substantially more than my roommate because I'm from Florida, he's from Georgia, and we both go to a school in Georgia. The reason for this tuition difference has to do with taxes you (or your parents) pay as a resident of the state. Public colleges can also be paid for with state scholarships, such as Georgia's HOPE Scholarship or Florida's Bright Futures Scholarship.
Private universities are not subsidized, meaning that prices may show a lesser or no difference between in-state and out-of-state students. In addition, state scholarships aren't applicable to private schools. Some private colleges will match the amount of a state scholarship if you qualify, but that is school-specific and needs to be researched by you.

Happy hunting ^.^
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