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  1. In Topic: [Link] Quasi-Polynomial Time Algorithm for Graph Isomorphism

    Posted 5 Jan 2016

    so what is the consensus of this

    i assume its still under review and will be for a long time?
  2. In Topic: Von Neumann's contribution to Computer Science?

    Posted 15 Nov 2015

    View Postjon.kiparsky, on 15 November 2015 - 01:39 AM, said:

    View PostCodeCruncher, on 14 November 2015 - 05:17 PM, said:

    Im not trying to discredit Johnny...he was one of the greatest minds and arguably the greatest mathematician of the 20th century, or one of the elite few

    but i was just wondering how big his contributions in CS are


    In a nutshell, I'd say that von Neumann's contributions were generally in integration, not invention, and this is true in computer science as well as in other areas of math. "How big" is this? Well, it can be pretty huge - for example, Donald Knuth's name rests almost entirely on TAOCP, which is entirely about synthesizing existing work into one integrated body of knowledge.
    I wouldn't put von Neumann at that level as a contributor to computer science, though. If he had not been there, I suspect CS would look more or less as it does now. If Knuth had not done his work, it's not clear to me that there would be such a singular collection of the known facts of computer science, and it certainly wouldn't have come out much like TAOCP.


    you mean Von Neumann wasn't known for making breakthroughs in any of his work he did (Math or Science)

    but just solid work?
  3. In Topic: Von Neumann's contribution to Computer Science?

    Posted 14 Nov 2015

    View Postandrewsw, on 14 November 2015 - 01:13 PM, said:

    Marginally off topic. I don't recall hearing the names Eckert and Mauchly before but, completely coincidently, I encountered there names for a second time in the same day, with mention of von Neumann:

    wikipedia said:

    Patent dispute

    Between 1954 and 1973, Atanasoff was a witness in the legal actions brought by various parties to invalidate electronic computing patents issued to John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert, which were owned by computer manufacturer Sperry Rand. In the 1973 decision of Honeywell v. Sperry Rand, a federal judge named Atanasoff the inventor of the electronic digital computer.

    Atanasoff first met Mauchly at the December 1940 meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Philadelphia, where Mauchly was demonstrating his "harmonic analyzer", an analog calculator for analysis of weather data. Atanasoff told Mauchly about his new digital device and invited him to see it. (During the Philadelphia trip, Atanasoff and Berry also conducted a patent search at the Patent Office in Washington, D.C.)

    In June 1941 Mauchly visited Atanasoff in Ames, Iowa for four days, staying as his houseguest. Atanasoff and Mauchly discussed the prototype ABC, examined it, and reviewed Atanasoff's design manuscript. In September 1942 Atanasoff left Iowa State for a wartime assignment as Chief of the Acoustic Division with the Naval Ordnance Laboratory (NOL) in Washington, D.C.; no patent application for the ABC was subsequently filed by Iowa State College.

    Mauchly visited Atanasoff multiple times in Washington during 1943 and discussed computing theories, but did not mention that he was working on a computer project himself until early 1944.[6]

    By 1945 the U.S. Navy had decided to build a large scale computer, on the advice of John von Neumann. Atanasoff was put in charge of the project, and he asked Mauchly to help with job descriptions for the necessary staff. However, Atanasoff was also given the responsibility for designing acoustic systems for monitoring atomic bomb tests. That job was made the priority, and by the time he returned from the testing at Bikini Atoll in July 1946, the NOL computer project was shut down due to lack of progress, again on the advice of von Neumann.

    In June 1954 IBM patent attorney A.J. Etienne sought Atanasoff's help in breaking an Eckert–Mauchly patent on a revolving magnetic memory drum, having been alerted by Clifford Berry that the ABC's revolving capacitor memory drum may have constituted prior art. Atanasoff agreed to assist the attorney, but IBM ultimately entered a patent-sharing agreement with Sperry Rand, the owners of the Eckert–Mauchly memory patent, and the case was dropped.[7]

    Atanasoff was deposed and testified at trial in the later action Honeywell v. Sperry Rand. In that case's decision, Judge Earl R. Larson found that "Eckert and Mauchly did not themselves first invent the automatic electronic digital computer, but instead derived that subject matter from one Dr. John Vincent Atanasoff".

    John Vincent Atanasoff


    Im not trying to discredit Johnny...he was one of the greatest minds and arguably the greatest mathematician of the 20th century, or one of the elite few

    but i was just wondering how big his contributions in CS are
  4. In Topic: Von Neumann's contribution to Computer Science?

    Posted 14 Nov 2015

    View Postandrewsw, on 14 November 2015 - 03:33 AM, said:

    Other than mentioning Eckert and Mauchly what has your research uncovered so far?


    well what i found was that Von Neumann developed stochastic computing

    he developed cellular autonoma

    and also a rigorous mathematical analysis of self-replicating systems (computers), which means he was one of the first to work on Computer Viruses essentially

    but the architecture is what he is probably most famous for, but many consider Johnny to be up with Turing as one of the greatest Computer Scientists of all time, do you guys agree with that assessment
  5. In Topic: [Link] Quasi-Polynomial Time Algorithm for Graph Isomorphism

    Posted 14 Nov 2015

    Scott Aaronson said it is potentially along the lines of "its the biggest computer science achievement of the decade"

    what do you guys think?

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