4 Replies - 1144 Views - Last Post: 12 September 2011 - 10:07 AM

#1 ryuu7   User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 0
  • View blog
  • Posts: 21
  • Joined: 26-August 11

Books suggestions for "Principles of Programming" class

Posted 08 September 2011 - 10:43 PM

In my new semester I will be having a class named "Principles of Programming". Upon checking my university's website, the class came with this brief description

Quote

This module considers basic programming concepts and principles, object oriented programming principles and design and testing


I would like to do some early preparation during my semester break and I'm not really sure what kind of books should i be finding for. Apart from the "design and testing" which might involve the phases of designing software and pseudocode and the obvious OOP, i'm not sure what else should i be aware of.

Is This A Good Question/Topic? 0
  • +

Replies To: Books suggestions for "Principles of Programming" class

#2 fromTheSprawl   User is offline

  • Bloodborne
  • member icon

Reputation: 522
  • View blog
  • Posts: 2,102
  • Joined: 28-December 10

Re: Books suggestions for "Principles of Programming" class

Posted 09 September 2011 - 12:53 AM

Basic pogramming and OOP is what's taught in Principle Programming. You'll also learn about data types, methods, the most common conditional operators and boolean operators. If you already know how to code that subject will be easy for you. Anyway I don't remember we took up "testing" on Principles but I don't know with you. Well, Head First books are always good. Why not couple your learning of principles with concrete implementations? Learn a language?

OOD
http://java.sun.com/...ogramming/ooad/
Was This Post Helpful? 1
  • +
  • -

#3 Nightfish   User is offline

  • D.I.C Head
  • member icon

Reputation: 74
  • View blog
  • Posts: 158
  • Joined: 24-May 11

Re: Books suggestions for "Principles of Programming" class

Posted 09 September 2011 - 04:13 AM

Did it occur to you to ask at your university? Ideally the guy giving the lecture? Usually Profs have contact information and believe it or not, they tend not to bite people's head off if a student dares to ask them a question. Just throwing this out there as a possibility.
Was This Post Helpful? 2
  • +
  • -

#4 ryuu7   User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 0
  • View blog
  • Posts: 21
  • Joined: 26-August 11

Re: Books suggestions for "Principles of Programming" class

Posted 09 September 2011 - 07:52 AM

View PostfromTheSprawl, on 09 September 2011 - 12:53 AM, said:

Basic pogramming and OOP is what's taught in Principle Programming. You'll also learn about data types, methods, the most common conditional operators and boolean operators. If you already know how to code that subject will be easy for you. Anyway I don't remember we took up "testing" on Principles but I don't know with you. Well, Head First books are always good. Why not couple your learning of principles with concrete implementations? Learn a language?

OOD
http://java.sun.com/...ogramming/ooad/


Thanks for the heads up. Yeah i'm pretty comfortable with Java right now so i hope i wont have any trouble. Will it go a little deeper to things like encapsulation and inheritence though(and more in this link:http://www.codeproject.com/KB/architecture/OOP_Concepts_and_manymore.aspx)?


Nightfish, I would love to but unfortunately I do not even know the lecturer teaching the class, or any staffs under the school of computer science. Heck i didn't even learned anything about computer science on my first semester though i'm on foundation going to computer science degree.

This post has been edited by ryuu7: 09 September 2011 - 07:56 AM

Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#5 jon.kiparsky   User is offline

  • Beginner
  • member icon


Reputation: 11093
  • View blog
  • Posts: 18,980
  • Joined: 19-March 11

Re: Books suggestions for "Principles of Programming" class

Posted 12 September 2011 - 10:07 AM

Quote

unfortunately I do not even know the lecturer teaching the class, or any staffs under the school of computer science.


Look him up. Doesn't the course catalog list the professor's name?


Typically, programming principles derive from programming practice. Case in point: design patterns. Everyone says, use design patterns, learn design patterns, but they really don't make sense if you haven't built anything outside of the simple student-code stuff.
There are stacks of books on the subject, and all of the ones I've looked at are perfectly useless, including the Gang of Four book. The reason? Design patterns are catalogs of common solutions to common problems, but you haven't met those problems yet.

If you haven't built an application that requires a Model-View-Controller pattern, the pattern simply doesn't make sense. When you find you need it, it's obvious that you need it, and you just need someone to point out that separating the presentation logic, the manipulation logic, and the data model will simplify your code.

If you try to implement a multi-level undo, you'll probably invent the Command Object pattern - at that point, you can read about that pattern and learn some good refinements, but the first thing you need to do is program yourself into a lot of corners so you see why this stuff is needed.

So my advice is to write some code - try to write something bigger than you've done before, not because you'll necessarily finish it, but because writing a big project exposes you to big problems of design, and you'll have some idea of why you need to know this stuff.
Was This Post Helpful? 2
  • +
  • -

Page 1 of 1