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#1 creativecoding   User is offline

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A professional attitude and your websites contents.

Posted 13 January 2012 - 04:42 PM

I'm pretty sure most of us here own some form of website, one way or another, and we all try to maintain a professional attitude with our content. It pretty goes for anyone that if they want respect and users, they will need to do this. But what if their site isn't "professional". Like a site from cheeseburger networks. Do you think they should still maintain a professional attitude?

An example of what I'm talking about may be the comparison between a software development company and a website containing lewd images. If you were the owner of that software development company, you would try to make the most "professional" image for yourself and essentially try to make yourself look good. However if you were the owner of a lewd images website, you most likely will not be doing this because that good look you're trying to give yourself will go away instantly after they see the content/type of site it is.


I'm not sure where I'm going at here, but I'd like to hear some input.

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#2 modi123_1   User is offline

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Re: A professional attitude and your websites contents.

Posted 13 January 2012 - 05:21 PM

Yeah - where are you going? Are you saying a porn site isn't professional? I am certain the home offices of Vivid Entertainment is a pretty straight up company. You don't think their clientele are less concerned about being professional? Pffsst.. yeah.

There's also a sense that if I have a personal site I would make it as I would care to have it be represented and somewhat care less about a mythological standard...
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#3 jon.kiparsky   User is offline

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Re: A professional attitude and your websites contents.

Posted 14 January 2012 - 10:56 PM

When you say a "website containing lewd images" site, do you mean your personal site which has some questionable content in it, or do you mean a dedicated site for wankers?
Both are problematic when it comes to interviews, for different reasons.

If someone's interviewing you, they're trying to work out who the hell you are, and they're going to use anything you give them to paint a mental picture. If you give them a personal site to look at, they're likely to look at it, and draw conclusions from it. You have to decide whether your personal site is going to give them any concerns. Remember, it's not just a matter of being good enough to do the job. The company will hire the person they think will be the "best fit for the position". If you give them something to worry about, and someone who's similarly qualified doesn't give them something to worry about, the other person will likely get the gig. And from an HR standpoint, it's very possible that your "lewd images" are their "workplace sexual harrassment case waiting to happen". Not fair, I know, but nobody ever promised "fair" in this game, did they?

If it's a business, there's a further issue you might not have thought of, but your interviewer might. That issue is theft of company bandwidth. I was recently in a room with three security professionals who were swapping stories about previous jobs, and each of them had a few stories about people, at different companies, who had managed to figure out a clever way to serve their private business over the company's lines. The sites all had one thong in common, which is an excellent typo all things considered.
I know it's a stretch, but most people hiring are risk-averse. They want someone who can do the job, and they have forty resumes from people who can do the job. If they get rid of the ones that seem to pose even remote risks of harm or embarrassment to the company, it makes their selection easier.
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#4 creativecoding   User is offline

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Re: A professional attitude and your websites contents.

Posted 16 January 2012 - 03:23 PM

Thanks, I've never thought of it from an employers standpoint. However I'm unsure of why you would ever want to include such a site in your portfolio, it better be backed up with some amazing programming or something.
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#5 Craig328   User is offline

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Re: A professional attitude and your websites contents.

Posted 17 January 2012 - 01:55 PM

The image your site portrays should serve the sensibilities of the customer/user you're trying to attract. There are sites wherein the content or the service the site sells trumps what some might feel is a less than polished presentation.

As in most things in life: function should go before form and form only matters inasmuch as your clientele cares about it.
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#6 lordofduct   User is offline

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Re: A professional attitude and your websites contents.

Posted 17 January 2012 - 02:14 PM

View Postmodi123_1, on 13 January 2012 - 07:21 PM, said:

Yeah - where are you going? Are you saying a porn site isn't professional? I am certain the home offices of Vivid Entertainment is a pretty straight up company. You don't think their clientele are less concerned about being professional? Pffsst.. yeah.

There's also a sense that if I have a personal site I would make it as I would care to have it be represented and somewhat care less about a mythological standard...



I worked for an adult website for 5 years ("adult... not porn... we are not a 'porn' site"). The atmosphere was both relaxed and professional. Think like "casual friday" every day. But the fact we were an adult website did not undermine any professional attitude***.

To give you an example I got the job through a friend of mine who put in a good word. We then went around our clique and got more of our friends hired. The office quickly filled up with a bunch of booze swilling, 20-somethings, who regularly partook in... "hedonistic"... life styles. Our fast paced, sex/drug packed, lifestyles often bled into the office. Sometimes stumbling into work dressed in our jam-jams, or swim shorts and sandals. My nick-name in the clique was 'Dyldo' or 'Da MagnificAn't Dyldo'... a childish play on my real name 'Dylan'. My desk was decorated in all sorts of paraphernalia, including a small dildo shaped pencil eraser top.

We all worked graveyard shift and few of the 'day crew' witnessed our... brash actions. One night the CEO had stayed late and was walking around and spotted my dildo eraser atop my monitor. He questioned its origin and it was explained to him about my psuedonym... well he was NOT pleased and it sparked an inquiry into what we had been doing at night there. Let's just say no one was calling me Dyldo anymore and we weren't wearing jam-jams or dresses (for the guys) to the office anymore.

Funny side story, the Jam-Jam thing started by accident when Liz wore her's in on halloween costume day... which was unbenounced to her. She played it off like she knew the whole time and even ran back to her car and procured a stuffed bear. In actuality we were just hung the fuck over from a pajama party the night before and she completely forgot.




***This is to how we made ourselves appear. Of course there were the less than professional things about the way the business conducted itself when it came to business ethics. I don't think the 'adult' nature of the website had anything to do with that, and more had to do with the general mis-conduct of companies I've witnessed in all tiers of industry.

This post has been edited by lordofduct: 17 January 2012 - 02:22 PM

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#7 modi123_1   User is offline

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Re: A professional attitude and your websites contents.

Posted 17 January 2012 - 02:25 PM

My point exactly!
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#8 lordofduct   User is offline

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Re: A professional attitude and your websites contents.

Posted 17 January 2012 - 02:29 PM

Agreed; just in a longer, and humorous, anecdote.
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#9 modi123_1   User is offline

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Re: A professional attitude and your websites contents.

Posted 17 January 2012 - 02:33 PM

I always figured I could work the web desk at a local adult toy shop if I ever got laid off... alas when I was laid off they were not hiring... and a few months into getting my job they were.
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#10 nooblet   User is offline

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Re: A professional attitude and your websites contents.

Posted 17 January 2012 - 08:51 PM

Plenty of sites out there that are informal or not strictly professional that aren't designed to be a icanhazcheezburger
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#11 no2pencil   User is offline

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Re: A professional attitude and your websites contents.

Posted 17 January 2012 - 08:58 PM

View Postcreativecoding, on 16 January 2012 - 05:23 PM, said:

I'm unsure of why you would ever want to include such a site in your portfolio, it better be backed up with some amazing programming or something.

One of the first websites that I ever did for a client was a local tattoo company. It used Javascript to flip images, & was (I felt) fairly advanced for 1999. You bet your ass I put that on my portfolio.

Money is money, & clients are clients. & if a potential client has a problem with someone else that I did business with, more-over being able to see the potential of what I did for that client & how it can relate to their own situation, that isn't really my problem or my short-coming.

Now that I think of it, I've done some work for adult related sites on Rent A Coder. It was just PayPal API back-end stuff, nothing glamorous or pushing the envelope of other work I've done.

I'm actually working with two clients right now that if they knew of one another, wouldn't be pleasant. They are a complete contrast with one anther's values & agenda.
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