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#1 itpro4470   User is offline

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C++ Books

Post icon  Posted 21 June 2007 - 04:57 AM

I am torn over which C++ book to go with I have been uainf the 7in1 C++ for dummies by Jeff Cogswell but I recently ran into the teach your self C++ in 24 hrs (yes...I know it will take more than one day) I looked good when I flipped through it and it was written in 2005 as opposed to C++ for dummies I have is 2003 but the teach yourself book is considerably smaller which leads me to believe they are either leaving out good information. Does anyone have any suggestions?

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Replies To: C++ Books

#2 no2pencil   User is offline

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Re: C++ Books

Posted 21 June 2007 - 05:09 AM

It depends on your reading style/preferance. When I first got into programming I simply picked up the Borland C++ Referance guide & it was made in 1995. I still use it today. The MSDN is also a great source for information.
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#3 itpro4470   User is offline

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Re: C++ Books

Posted 21 June 2007 - 06:25 AM

View Postno2pencil, on 21 Jun, 2007 - 05:09 AM, said:

It depends on your reading style/preferance. When I first got into programming I simply picked up the Borland C++ Referance guide & it was made in 1995. I still use it today. The MSDN is also a great source for information.

The main thing I am worried about is outdated material. I have a few technical certs A+,N+,CCNA,MCP and after I had been studying CCNA for a while I realised the book I was reading was out of date and useless for the current test. I know C++ has been around for a while but unsure if the reading material for the basics is time sensitive or pretty much the same. I think I'll buy the other book and go through that too if nothing else I will have a more solid understanding.
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#4 no2pencil   User is offline

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Re: C++ Books

Posted 21 June 2007 - 06:33 AM

Your outdated matrial would be primarily (specific) compiler based. Say you're using MS VC++ rather than Borland. The language itself shouldn't change over a 2 year period. However, some API calls (specific code) for Vista will be different than XP API calls. Again, I wouldn't think that the C++ language changed much from 2003 to 2005, or until today 2007.
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#5 itpro4470   User is offline

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Re: C++ Books

Posted 21 June 2007 - 07:00 AM

Thanks for the info no2pencil!! I was starting to get worried
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#6 amer83   User is offline

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Re: C++ Books

Posted 21 June 2007 - 02:48 PM

View Postitpro4470, on 21 Jun, 2007 - 04:57 AM, said:

I am torn over which C++ book to go with I have been uainf the 7in1 C++ for dummies by Jeff Cogswell but I recently ran into the teach your self C++ in 24 hrs (yes...I know it will take more than one day) I looked good when I flipped through it and it was written in 2005 as opposed to C++ for dummies I have is 2003 but the teach yourself book is considerably smaller which leads me to believe they are either leaving out good information. Does anyone have any suggestions?

i think c++ how to program is a good book.
it comes with code examples.
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#7 Xing   User is offline

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Re: C++ Books

Posted 21 June 2007 - 08:54 PM

Start with Accelerated C++, By Andrew koenig and Barbara Moo
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#8 musya   User is offline

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Re: C++ Books

Posted 10 September 2007 - 10:54 AM

View PostXing, on 21 Jun, 2007 - 08:54 PM, said:

Start with Accelerated C++, By Andrew koenig and Barbara Moo

hehe Moo!
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#9 mondauthor   User is offline

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Re: C++ Books

Posted 10 September 2007 - 03:15 PM

Hi,
I started with Juan Soulie's C++ Tutorials to acquaint myself with syntax and basic knowledge of the language and have moved on to Bruce Eckel's "Thinking in C++" which is primarily for programmers moving from C to C++.

These items are open source, downloadable, and printable. So, other than the cost of some paper and a printer cartridge refill kit, I think I have some good material to work from, just to get started.

I also find that getting more than one author's take on any programming language is a good thing. Absorb from each source what works best for you.

Mond
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#10 nirvanarupali   User is offline

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Re: C++ Books

Posted 10 September 2007 - 09:30 PM

View Postno2pencil, on 21 Jun, 2007 - 06:33 AM, said:

Your outdated matrial would be primarily (specific) compiler based. Say you're using MS VC++ rather than Borland. The language itself shouldn't change over a 2 year period. However, some API calls (specific code) for Vista will be different than XP API calls. Again, I wouldn't think that the C++ language changed much from 2003 to 2005, or until today 2007.



Yeah that's right, Maybe the new Standards in C++00x will be in 2009.
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#11 ModestBigferd   User is offline

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Re: C++ Books

Posted 11 September 2007 - 02:57 AM

View Postmondauthor, on 10 Sep, 2007 - 03:15 PM, said:

I also find that getting more than one author's take on any programming language is a good thing. Absorb from each source what works best for you.

Mond


I absolutely agree with this. I started with "C++ for Dummies", then I went through Bruce Eckel's "Thinking in C++" books, and now I'm onto "Tricks of the Windows Game Programming Gurus" and "Sams Teach Yourself: Game Proramming in 24 Hours". Programming books seem to concentrate on some things and breeze through others based on the author's style and idea of importance. It's helpful to see something from multiple perspectives.

PS. "C++ for Dummies" is a good book to start with. The learning curve and pun humor helped me stick it out in the beginning.
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