which book should I read first to begin ?

I knew a little about cpp,so,what should I do next?

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36 Replies - 14360 Views - Last Post: 13 February 2011 - 11:08 AM

#31 KittyKat   User is offline

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Re: which book should I read first to begin ?

Posted 02 April 2009 - 08:00 AM

View PostBench, on 1 Apr, 2009 - 09:42 AM, said:

View PostKittyKat, on 30 Mar, 2009 - 05:14 PM, said:

Ok since I am new to this programming stuff, I did buy a C++ for dummies book......... is this book really that bad for learning c++?
Yes, its a fairly poor beginners' book these days because its entire approach is simply outdated and omits many of the very useful, important modern features of C++. Though even when it was brand new it was mediocre at best - there have always been better C++ books around, written by people who genuinely understand the needs of learners, and how to effectively teach the language so that their readers reap the maximum benefit from their time spent.

View PostKittyKat, on 30 Mar, 2009 - 05:14 PM, said:

Which book should I buy??.. I do have complier though that came with this book.... Guess compilers are basically the same??? thanks for any info.....
Read the earlier responses in this thread for some suggestions. Be wary of recommendations from people who are still learning - Learning is always a personal experience for everyone, and often, those who learn from a bad book are equally satisfied with their chosen resource as those who learn from a good book, even if there are those who spent time with the C++ for dummies book and report wonderful things from their own experience, you can make a sure bet that those people will be blissfully unaware of just how many bad habits and how much misinformation they've actually been absorbing, compared with someone who picked up a far more accurate and informed book such as 'You Can Do It' or 'Accelerated C++' - books which aim to teach C++ in such a way that makes the whole experience as useful and insightful as possible.

:) Thanks ALL for your responses....... ;)

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#32 jessore   User is offline

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Re: which book should I read first to begin ?

Posted 22 July 2009 - 11:38 AM

Helo sekthree,

I need also "Starting out with C++:from control structures to Objects " book...do U have pdf format? I mean ebook...can give me this one plz??...I badly need this book...:( ...my email id: [email protected] or [email protected]

Thnx & Regards

Arif

View Postsekthree, on 22 Jan, 2008 - 12:23 PM, said:

i personally like books by Tony Gaddis..

"Starting out with C++:from control structures to Objects "

is the first book i read and developed what i know today...


noonch!!

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#33 AcroneShadow   User is offline

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Re: which book should I read first to begin ?

Posted 23 July 2009 - 05:43 AM

View PostNickDMax, on 10 Sep, 2007 - 08:02 AM, said:

This is one of those FAQs on the forum so a search of the forum will return many discussions on the topic.

Many people seem to recommend "The C++ Programming Language (Special 3rd Edition) " by Bjarne Stroustrup. It is a really great book in my opinion.

Typically entry to mid level programming books come in three flavors:

"How-to" -- Lots of examples, light on theory. Although these are typically easy to follow, many of them contain technical mistakes (usually due to an attempt to keep the material simple -- I always get mad when I learn that they taught me bad practices, or misguided me).

"Textbook" -- Tend to have a mixture of theory and examples. Much of the material is actually covered in the "Assignments" so you should work the problems. Can be very boring.

"Reference" -- My favorite. These tend to be much more technical. They try to cover a lot of information and tend to have lots and lots of small examples.

Generally the three types can be distinguished by their thickness. The "how-to" books tend to be rather slim, and the Reference books tend to be really thick. The text books tend to fall in the middle.

Personally I like the reference books.

Some of the other threads on this topic are:

29646
28438
26252
24939
108390

I added this topic to the C++ FAQ, so if everyone would throw in their favorite C++ book maybe we can have a good resource for this common question.


OMG thank you so much for telling me about The C++ Programming Language (Special 3rd Edition) by Bjarne Stroustrup. I had a sample read of it and it was amazing. I liked it so much that i even bought the .pdf for it. There goes $65. Anyway thank you so much!
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#34 Iamazn   User is offline

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Re: which book should I read first to begin ?

Posted 27 July 2009 - 01:33 PM

Whats good book thats rly cheap or free?
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#35 anbarasan.31143   User is offline

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Re: which book should I read first to begin ?

Posted 05 August 2009 - 11:22 PM

View Postbobby.l, on 10 Sep, 2007 - 04:29 AM, said:

I knew a little about cpp,so,what should I do next?
which book do you read first?




Please read local Author : Ravichandran , then go for Black book



Moderator Edit:

I am sorry anbarasan.31143 but Ravichandran's book is TERRIBLE and is one of the most horrible crimes being committed against beginner programmers. The book teaches horrible practices on an ancient compiler. We see so many frustrated young programmers on this site trying to get code from their ancient compilers to work on modern PCs and it is sad -- this book is largely to blame for their plight. I can not in good conscience allow this book to be recommended to new programmers. IMO using this book to teach from is criminal and ANYONE who charges money an uses this as a textbook should be jailed as a thief.

I can not let this recommendation stand.
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#36 lwhite3   User is offline

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Re: which book should I read first to begin ?

Posted 12 November 2010 - 11:14 AM

I'm just starting C++ myself, and the free edition of Herb Schildtz's(sp?) C++ Beginner's Guide is really easy to understand. Also, If you google MIT Open CourseWare, MIT has some programming courses online that anyone can access for free. They don't go as in depth as the Beginner's Guide though and rely more on you doing the legwork after they've pointed you in the right direction. The C++ Introduction course is under Electrical Engineering and Computer Science on their site.

EDIT: I read a few of the other posts after putting this up, and I would definitely agree that you need to have a background in some other language for Herb Schildt's book to be effective. He definitely assumes you have knowledge of basic things before starting. As for the MIT stuff, I first learned programming in high school from a brilliant teacher who had a very "this is the code, you go figure out how to make it effective" approach. This may be why I found those two sources effective.

This post has been edited by lwhite3: 12 November 2010 - 11:22 AM

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#37 Yuki-Chuki   User is offline

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Re: which book should I read first to begin ?

Posted 13 February 2011 - 11:08 AM

Hello everyone,

I'd like a book recommendation too. Are there any books out there for people like me? I'm studying IT science for about 3 years now and I work part time as a developer at a company.. I've got a fairly good grip on Java and C# (I think I'm not to bad at them. Though, I'm far away from calling myself an expert (I'm fairly intermediate I think)). I learned about concepts like UML, test driven development, design patterns, etc., etc. and was able to gain some valuable experience writing one or the other piece of software. Both private and for the company I work for.

So, are there any books out there for people "transfering" from another language?

I'd like to learn about the concepts of C++ and stuff like what is efficient in this language and what not. But if possible at all I don't want to be explained to once again what a function, an object, a variable and such is. I heard it a few times now...

Maybe there's nothing like that out there. If not, I'd at least like a book which is suited for people allready knowing a third generation language but which never have written anything in C++.

Excues me for making one or the other grammatical error. English isn't my native language. I'm really trying but I still have a huge battle going on with the rules of punctuation ;)

Thanks a lot
Yuk
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