5 Replies - 800 Views - Last Post: 18 October 2015 - 07:22 PM

#1 NetworkWarrior   User is offline

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Network Engineer wants to become Dev

Posted 18 October 2015 - 01:26 PM

Hi everyone,

I'm trying to figure out the best way to make the switch from Network Engineer to Developer. I do have a CS degree. I did help desk work in college and for 2 years after college until I eventually ended up as a Network Engineer. I have been a network engineer for 3 years already now. I love the work, but am starting to wonder if the grass is greener on the other side. :-) I feel like I have a decent foundation for software engineering due to my degree, but regret never getting the chance to do it professionally.

What is the best way to go about this? I have been hearing a lot about these code boot camps that guarantee jobs after graduating. When I first heard of these I thought they were a scam, but I have a high school friend who came out of one of these programs and did get a decent Dev position. Would these type of programs be a viable option to build up a portfolio and take advantage of their job placement programs? Should I just self-study and build a portfolio on my own?

Open to all advice. Particularly interested in other IT professionals who made the jump from an admin to Dev.

Thank you!

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Replies To: Network Engineer wants to become Dev

#2 astonecipher   User is offline

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Re: Network Engineer wants to become Dev

Posted 18 October 2015 - 02:05 PM

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that guarantee jobs after graduating.

No such thing.

The code camps may be good, but they will crash course the basics. The same can be found in almost any book. You are already secure in an IT position, I assume. So, time isn't a major factor for you. It's more, pick a direction. You probably have a leg up, because you are already known. What about transferring to the dev section of your current company?
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#3 tlhIn`toq   User is offline

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Re: Network Engineer wants to become Dev

Posted 18 October 2015 - 02:56 PM

You're a network engineer. Clearly you have an IQ higher than your shoe size and have experience on the internet.

When you found the "Cubical Corner" area AND READ BACK A COUPLE PAGES OF TOPICS, I'm sure you found the several previous threads about how to become a developer/how to transition into developer.

So what did you think of those previous threads and the advice already given to the people that have asked this same question in the past?
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#4 jon.kiparsky   User is offline

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Re: Network Engineer wants to become Dev

Posted 18 October 2015 - 04:24 PM

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When I first heard of these I thought they were a scam


You were right. If there were a secret recipe that could teach you everything you need to know to be a software developer in a couple of weeks, then there would be so many software developers running around that the pay would fall through the floor. You don't get something for nothing, which is what these people are trying to sell you.

Now, considering that you have some experience working in tech, you're in a better position than most. And since you have a CS degree, the situation is even better. If your organization is reasonably smart, I would start by talking to some of the leads in the development teams in your current organization. Ask them if they'd mind doing a mock interview and giving you and honest read on your chops as a developer. Would they hire you today as a junior dev? If not, what would they need to see? This will help you figure out what you need to work on. It might even turn out that your organization is smart enough to realize that they would be willing to help you transition into a dev role in-house. This would basically mean you would work with the dev team as a junior developer, and they'd help you get up to speed, and presumably you would help train up a new admin person to take on the stuff you'd be leaving behind. This is really a win all the way around - the dev team gets a cross-functional team member who understands the systems side of the company, you get a job that's closer to what you want to be doing, and the company gets a smooth transition, a happier dev team, and a backup admin in the building in case your replacement ever does something silly like getting a cold or taking a vacation.

If you don't feel comfortable approaching this within your current organization, then I suggest you just go talk to some recruiters. Tell them where you're at and what you'd like to be doing. They're in the business of finding places for you to work, they'll be able to set you up with some interviews. That's a really good way to find out what you need, and what you're lacking.
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#5 no2pencil   User is offline

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Re: Network Engineer wants to become Dev

Posted 18 October 2015 - 04:30 PM

A place that offers 'guaranteed placement' is likely to have an inside connection with a company that hires entry level & expects lots of high turn over. Doesn't sound like a promising future that I would want.
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#6 astonecipher   User is offline

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Re: Network Engineer wants to become Dev

Posted 18 October 2015 - 07:22 PM

Or its a way to get your money. Everest college got in trouble for their placement numbers. A lady got her degree in accounting. They counted it as "working in her chosen profession", when she was employed at taco bell as a cashier. So, guaranteed placement, doesn't necessarily mean placed in what you think you would be doing. Could mean the mailroom for a company with a tech department.
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