5 Replies - 746 Views - Last Post: 19 September 2016 - 08:29 PM

#1 e_i_pi   User is offline

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Addressing selection criteria you don't have

Posted 19 September 2016 - 05:51 PM

I'm in an interesting situation where I've been head hunted by a recruitment agency for a Senior DW/BI position, and I'm dead keen for the role as it ticks all the boxes and then some, but I'm missing one of the selection criteria. It's only a "desirable" criterion (as opposed to "essential"), so I'm not heavy-hearted about it, but I'd like to get some feedback on how it should be addressed. I can't just leave it out, I need to say something, and it would be nicer to put a positive spin on it rather than just say "nope, that's not me".

The criterion is:

Quote

Prior knowledge of (Federal Government Department) methodologies and technology


So, I've never worked for this Department, but I have worked directly for a State Government Departmentbetween 2007-2011 (which is a long time ago in IT), and recently indirectly with a different State Government Department who was the main client at my last workplace.

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Replies To: Addressing selection criteria you don't have

#2 astonecipher   User is offline

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Re: Addressing selection criteria you don't have

Posted 19 September 2016 - 06:27 PM

So, you do have knowledge of the area requested. The methodologies and technologies over there maybe different than here, but here government anything isn't exactly on the cusp of anything cutting edge.
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#3 e_i_pi   User is offline

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Re: Addressing selection criteria you don't have

Posted 19 September 2016 - 06:52 PM

No knowledge whatsoever, apart from what they're talking about in the PD. Luckily they're referencing BIDS/SSRS/SSIS/SSAS, which I have a heap of experience in, and on top of that I've worked with all the major RDMSs (MySQL, MSSQL, PostgreSQL, DB2, Oracle), as well as both ISS/Apache, and with several web languages. Maybe I can tout that - that my experience casts a wide net over the technical spectrum, and that because of that I have no trouble picking up new technologies, or integrating disparate systems.

This post has been edited by e_i_pi: 19 September 2016 - 06:53 PM

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#4 modi123_1   User is online

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Re: Addressing selection criteria you don't have

Posted 19 September 2016 - 07:13 PM

Take what you know, and see if you can marry that to any of the 'federal government project management' or 'software development' searches. I came across quite a few articles, pdf handbooks, etc out there.. I would imagine it hasn't gone too far outside of polishing some terms.
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#5 jon.kiparsky   User is offline

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Re: Addressing selection criteria you don't have

Posted 19 September 2016 - 08:21 PM

Go in strong with what you do have: All of the criteria that you've met, plus prior experience in a similar role. If you're looking good on everything else, you'll get the call back and they'll ask you how you'll do with the methodologies and technology, and you'll say that probably some things have changed in the last few years, and what are they using these days. Then you're in a conversation about different technology stacks, and you should be on your own home turf at that point. The way this could be annoying is if they have some internal candidate that they really want to get in there, but they have to make an open call for the position. In that case, it won't matter what you say in the interview, you're just there for plausible deniability and they're going to say "well, you were good, but we had this other candidate who was very familiar with methodologies and technology, so we went with him" - but you can't really do much about that case, so don't spend a lot of time on it.
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#6 e_i_pi   User is offline

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Re: Addressing selection criteria you don't have

Posted 19 September 2016 - 08:29 PM

View Postjon.kiparsky, on 20 September 2016 - 02:21 PM, said:

The way this could be annoying is if they have some internal candidate that they really want to get in there, but they have to make an open call for the position. In that case, it won't matter what you say in the interview...

Not a chance here. It's two contract positions that require a very special type of government accreditation, they want three applicants maximum, and I got a call about sixty seconds after sending in my CV/Cover Letter. I'd say I'll be competing against two other outsiders, or it may just be me and one other, in which case I'm a shoo in.

I like your idea about turning it around and getting them to reveal the stack so that I can latch on to strong topics of conversation. I'll keep that in mind if I get an interview, though it's great advice for anyone in any situation - turn it to your advantage rather than play defence. :tup:
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