5 Replies - 1250 Views - Last Post: 24 November 2017 - 11:19 AM

#1 Vette   User is offline

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Java GUI Technologies for Desktop

Posted 24 November 2017 - 07:49 AM

Greetings:

I am not very experienced with GUI desktop programming. However, I have used Swing and have been reasonably satisfied with the experience. With that being said, I am a bit confused as to what is the "standard' or "go-to" technology of today. I understand JavaFX is newer and supposed to replace Swing. However, and this certainly be a mistake, based on my Internet searching, it does not really appear as if the technology ever really "took off". For example, it does not appear as if Oracle provides downloads for SceneBuilder any longer. I found a couple of relevant questions on Stack Overflow (here and here), but they are from a couple or so years ago and, to me, not conclusive. I found this clarity also lacking in a relevant Reddit question.

I love Java, but do not work at a place that really uses the technology. As such, I am a bit perplexed. What is the preferred approach for building graphical applications using Java today?

Thanks.

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#2 macosxnerd101   User is online

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Re: Java GUI Technologies for Desktop

Posted 24 November 2017 - 07:52 AM

The only industry that uses Java for desktop applications is the standardized testing industry (e.g., the GRE, state standardized tests for K-12, etc.). They still use Swing, to the best of my knowledge. If you are using Java professionally, then it is likely a server-side application (e.g., Java EE, or a Java SE app that runs on a server) or Android mobile development.
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#3 andrewsw   User is online

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Re: Java GUI Technologies for Desktop

Posted 24 November 2017 - 08:03 AM

Of course, there is nothing to prevent you from spending some time with JavaFX anyway, just because it is interesting ;). It does no harm to dip your toes in different features and technologies.
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#4 Vette   User is offline

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Re: Java GUI Technologies for Desktop

Posted 24 November 2017 - 08:20 AM

Thanks for the responses; I guess that explains the lack of information. :)/>

As I noted, I do not work in an environment that uses Java extensively, but after being exposed to quite a few languages, it is probably my personal favorite. However, compared to a language such as Javascript (for which online blog posts and like tend to abound), it does seem a little harder to keep up with the latest Java news and practices. Is there a good source for Java related developments and news?

This post has been edited by Vette: 24 November 2017 - 08:21 AM

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#5 andrewsw   User is online

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Re: Java GUI Technologies for Desktop

Posted 24 November 2017 - 08:30 AM

I used to receive newsletters from javaworld which were quite good as I recall. I searched "java newsletter" to remind me of this.

I'm not writing Java, though, so someone else might have a more experienced and current suggestion ;)
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#6 ndc85430   User is offline

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Re: Java GUI Technologies for Desktop

Posted 24 November 2017 - 11:19 AM

You might also want to check out videos from Java conferences, like JavaOne, JAX or Devoxx. Note that the Java world also encompasses other languages (since Java is a platform, not just a language) like Scala, Kotlin, Groovy and Clojure.

This post has been edited by ndc85430: 24 November 2017 - 11:20 AM

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