Hello, My name is Michael. I'm a new techie.

I ask for programming language question.

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3 Replies - 345 Views - Last Post: 27 December 2018 - 10:47 PM

#1 AddictedTechie   User is offline

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Hello, My name is Michael. I'm a new techie.

Posted 27 December 2018 - 05:46 PM

What is the lowest level of programming languages for new programmer/coder?

I need to learn coding to be a professional programmer/coder for new job.
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#2 Martyr2   User is offline

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Re: Hello, My name is Michael. I'm a new techie.

Posted 27 December 2018 - 05:51 PM

I think you mean what is the easiest language to learn, not necessarily lowest level. Lowest level would mean as close to the machine language as possible. If you are wanting to learn programming for a programmer job, there are many languages you can learn. The important thing is to learn one and the skills you will get from it can help you learn others.

My suggestion would be a language like Python, Javascript or Java. But it all depends on what kind of programs you want to create. If you want to develop for the web, you will need HTML/CSS and Javascript. No ifs ands or buts about it. They are relatively easy to learn. If you want to do desktop development, Python or Java are what are taught the most in schools and can help you learn about object oriented programming.

But these are suggestions and obviously you are going to get a ton of suggestions of languages. The trick is to pick one that makes the most sense to you and stick with that. Again because if you learn that one, it will be easier to learn others.

:)
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#3 AddictedTechie   User is offline

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Re: Hello, My name is Michael. I'm a new techie.

Posted 27 December 2018 - 06:18 PM

View PostMartyr2, on 27 December 2018 - 05:51 PM, said:

I think you mean what is the easiest language to learn, not necessarily lowest level. Lowest level would mean as close to the machine language as possible. If you are wanting to learn programming for a programmer job, there are many languages you can learn. The important thing is to learn one and the skills you will get from it can help you learn others.

My suggestion would be a language like Python, Javascript or Java. But it all depends on what kind of programs you want to create. If you want to develop for the web, you will need HTML/CSS and Javascript. No ifs ands or buts about it. They are relatively easy to learn. If you want to do desktop development, Python or Java are what are taught the most in schools and can help you learn about object oriented programming.

But these are suggestions and obviously you are going to get a ton of suggestions of languages. The trick is to pick one that makes the most sense to you and stick with that. Again because if you learn that one, it will be easier to learn others.

:)/>



Okay, it's great. Where I click to?
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#4 jon.kiparsky   User is offline

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Re: Hello, My name is Michael. I'm a new techie.

Posted 27 December 2018 - 10:47 PM

It's important to point out that working as a programmer is not mostly about learning a programming language, or even many languages, any more than being an architect is about learning to draw blueprints. Yes, you need languages to do the work, but simply knowing languages is not even a start on becoming a hireable developer.

While you do not need to get a formal CS degree to be hired as a programmer, there is a lot that you need to know about which falls under the heading of computer science and/or software engineering. If you're not sure about where to get started, I strongly recommend that you at least explore the options at educational institutions in your area. Even a handful of courses will get you a long way towards understanding what sorts of things you need to know. Right now, you're in the Rumsfeldian space of "unknown unknowns", which is where we all start and a lousy place to stay.
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