4 Replies - 301 Views - Last Post: 06 July 2019 - 06:36 PM

#1 holy9ner   User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 0
  • View blog
  • Posts: 11
  • Joined: 22-June 15

Masters in Computer Science

Posted 06 July 2019 - 01:06 AM

Hello Forum,

I am new here but have maybe an interesting question. I now have a bachelor's in applied mathematics and applied statistics degrees. I graduated with a 3.92 and a 4.0 with my degrees. I do know multiple languages but because of my degrees the languages I know such as python, R, SAS etc do not really help me with computer science as a whole. Because of my history as well, I am not the best computer science major but because of my GPA and GRE scores and performance I am able to get into any computer science masters program i want to. I know I will have to take the 5 remedial classes but I truly want to know how hard will it be to transition to a graduate program in computer science without having a bachelors in it. Should I get another bachelors or go straight to grad school with computer science. What will be my obstacles and do you think it is a very easy transition.



thank you in advance,

Tom

Is This A Good Question/Topic? 0
  • +

Replies To: Masters in Computer Science

#2 xclite   User is offline

  • I wrote you an code
  • member icon


Reputation: 1389
  • View blog
  • Posts: 4,220
  • Joined: 12-May 09

Re: Masters in Computer Science

Posted 06 July 2019 - 06:58 AM

Well, what are your goals? A master's in computer science can be very interesting (and frequently tempts me), but isn't necessarily going to make you a better software engineer, for example.

I in any case don't think I'd recommend getting another bachelor's in C.S.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#3 macosxnerd101   User is online

  • Games, Graphs, and Auctions
  • member icon




Reputation: 12634
  • View blog
  • Posts: 45,800
  • Joined: 27-December 08

Re: Masters in Computer Science

Posted 06 July 2019 - 10:52 AM

Quote

I now have a bachelor's in applied mathematics and applied statistics degrees.


You sound extremely qualified to enroll in a Master's program in Computer Science. I'm about to start a PhD program in the fall in a very good program, which regularly admits folks from other disciplines like Psychology, Neuroscience, and Linguistics. And these admits turn out to be very successful!


Quote

I know such as python, R, SAS


Python is very common in Machine Learning and Data Science. A lot of folks also use it in industry.


Quote

I know I will have to take the 5 remedial classes


Can you expand on what classes you would have to take? Five classes sounds excessive to me. If you have coursework in Data Structures I and Data Structures II, you should honestly be fine. If not, work to get up to speed in these areas. A senior theory course like Algorithms or Theory of Computation would be nice; but quite frankly, many grad students end up taking one or both of these courses at the start of their programs.


I second xclite's question- what are your goals? What do you want to get out of the program? It would be helpful (for both yourself and us) if you could identify the key skills you want to learn.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#4 holy9ner   User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 0
  • View blog
  • Posts: 11
  • Joined: 22-June 15

Re: Masters in Computer Science

Posted 06 July 2019 - 05:37 PM

Thank you all for your answers!!! It seriously very much appreciated. With my applied stats degree I specialized in machine learning/AI and then used my mathematical background to write code that had much better algorithms as a mathematician is able to understand the concepts at a much deeper level. I feel in love with analysis/analytics. I do however not really want to do a masters/PhD in applied mathematics because at that level you truly are doing math for the sack of math and I have found myself in much more of the applied notion of mathematics rather than the theory of it. Computer science is so much broader and I will never really "want" for a job with a degree in it. Not to say I would with math, but computer science is so much more broad. I know there are machine learning paths, but out of curosity I was wondering how hard it would be to branch out into networking or security without a BS in CS. In school I also worked with Computer Vision and Natural language processing such as sentiment analysis and modeling pictures for classifcation. My research for tumor prediction with computer vision is currently being published so I was kind of thinking that route to be honest since I know quite a bit about it already.

To those wondering what my prereq would be without a CS class here are the classes they make non CS majors take. Intro to Computer Science, Advanced Programming, Data Structures and Algorithms; I do not have to take the other two because I was a math major and already have them.

Thank you again in advance.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#5 macosxnerd101   User is online

  • Games, Graphs, and Auctions
  • member icon




Reputation: 12634
  • View blog
  • Posts: 45,800
  • Joined: 27-December 08

Re: Masters in Computer Science

Posted 06 July 2019 - 06:36 PM

Quote

but out of curosity I was wondering how hard it would be to branch out into networking or security without a BS in CS.


While not impossible, you would have to spend a significant amount of time getting up to speed in operating systems and architecture. It is likely you would need to take some deficiency/undergraduate courses to gain the necessary background. If you wanted to go for a PhD in this area, then it might be worthwhile to do this in your Master's program. Otherwise, it might be more trouble than it is worth.

It would also be hard to secure funding in this area. In Math, graduate degrees are almost always funded. This funding is in the form of teaching assistantships. In CS, TA positions go almost exclusively to PhD students. There are also research assistant (RA) positions, where individual faculty use their grants to fund students. These go to PhD and Masters students, so that the students can spend time performing research for the lab. If you aren't up to speed in an area, it would be challenging to obtain RA funding. As a masters student, I wouldn't hold my breath for TA funding.

In the event that there is TA funding, you would have to make a compelling case to the admissions committee as to why you would be successful in this area. That means spending a little time getting up to speed on the basics (undergraduate material) and some of the research in this domain. If you don't have background in an area and cannot articulate some clear interests, then it's hard to make the case that you should be funded.

In general, one should avoid paying for graduate school.


Quote

In school I also worked with Computer Vision and Natural language processing such as sentiment analysis and modeling pictures for classifcation. My research for tumor prediction with computer vision is currently being published so I was kind of thinking that route to be honest since I know quite a bit about it already.


I think you could make a compelling case for RA funding in this area.


Quote

To those wondering what my prereq would be without a CS class here are the classes they make non CS majors take. Intro to Computer Science, Advanced Programming, Data Structures and Algorithms; I do not have to take the other two because I was a math major and already have them.


It sounds like you have looked only at one school. I would suggest looking at other schools with multiple faculty members in areas that interest you.

With that said, Data Structures I-II are very reasonable prerequisites for graduate studies in CS. I would suggest taking them (or mastering said material) before pursuing grad school in this area.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

Page 1 of 1