3 Replies - 595 Views - Last Post: 02 December 2019 - 08:17 AM

#1 [email protected]   User is offline

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Investment in Architecture

Posted 06 November 2019 - 05:49 AM

Should I as a Junior Developer invest my time now into software architecture, even with basic app development so you can practice how everything fits together?
I have been following this Javascript course through Udemy and he not only shows how to code but also explains a little bit about architecture and patterns to create your app, which made more sense to me.

What software could you recommend to design architecture and what are some good focus points on how good architecture looks like.

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Replies To: Investment in Architecture

#2 Skydiver   User is offline

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Re: Investment in Architecture

Posted 06 November 2019 - 08:01 AM

Although you can go hog wild with almost any drawing tool that supports UML, I find that in the end, the best architectures are simple enough that you can draw them on napkin with a pen and explain them within minutes.

If you really want to use a piece of software to the the drawing, I've found that Gliffy ends up being the best tool to use. It's a general purpose diagramming/drawing tool. It doesn't have all the bells and whistles that Visio or Rational Rose have, but what it does have is a very user friendly and intuitive interface. It feels like a tool put together by an artist for artists and engineers. Visio and Rational Rose feel more like something that a CAD engineer/programmer would create for other geeks. Gliffy lets me get my ideas on the screen quickly and efficiently, while other tools have me futzing around with connection points, sizing, fonts, colors, etc. for each and every item put on diagram.

I recommend at least learning about design patterns. Don't feel compelled to learn each one in deep detail in your first pass, but rather just do a general survey of them and get a feel for when using them would be appropriate, and when they would not. You can get in deeper with each pattern when you finally come around to deciding that a pattern may help solve a solution. If/when you do choose a pattern, don't feel compelled to implement it strictly, or worse implement a pattern just for the sake of using a pattern. Instead let the idea of the pattern guide you towards a solution.
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#3 [email protected]   User is offline

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Re: Investment in Architecture

Posted 06 November 2019 - 01:04 PM

Yeah, one pattern that I have learned through the course was the module pattern.
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#4 astonecipher   User is offline

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Re: Investment in Architecture

Posted 02 December 2019 - 08:17 AM

Starting out, it's best to keep things as simple as possible. The more you learn, the more you experiment, you get to see architectures that work better for certain problems. Things like transient exceptions have patterns to mitigate issues, as do almost every other problem you might see. For your sanity, just start working on things from the ground up in a simplistic mindset and let the process evolve from there.
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