4 Replies - 413 Views - Last Post: 29 April 2020 - 09:49 PM

#1 TheCoach   User is offline

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Degree required ?

Posted 29 April 2020 - 10:16 AM

Hi everyone!

In your opinion/experience , can you become you make a living programming without degree?

Will a company take me seriously with "just" a boot camp?

Thank you
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Replies To: Degree required ?

#2 DarenR   User is offline

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Re: Degree required ?

Posted 29 April 2020 - 10:36 AM

yes you can however it will be really hard for you to do it if you dont have experience.
in general a computer degree shows you understand the concepts and have had experience in them.
without one , you can just say you have experience but have nothing to back it up

If you are going without a degree i suggest doing a lot of projects that you can showcase to potential employers but beware this is the hard long route
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#3 modi123_1   User is offline

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Re: Degree required ?

Posted 29 April 2020 - 11:42 AM

Some may if you can pivot existing skills, and aptitude, into a level 1 position. I mean I've see a M.A. Mechanical Engineer pivot into an entry level programming job.. so it's possible.

Those bootcamps are a little leery. Some are just for-profit money makers, and others are a little better. Test the waters in your area to see which ones are considered legit and favorable.
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#4 jon.kiparsky   User is online

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Re: Degree required ?

Posted 29 April 2020 - 12:15 PM

The tech world is starting to be a lot more accepting of bootcamp graduates, so getting hired with a bootcamp for your background is getting easier. However, I will point out that I have been mentoring at a bootcamp here in Boston for several years, and while the quality of instruction there is very high and there is a ton of community support, people still struggle a lot, and I spend a lot of time filling in the many gaps that are necessarily left, given the compressed time-frame that a program like this can offer.
Basically, a very good bootcamp can prepare you to get the job, but you're going to be struggling a lot, and you'll probably need a lot of help, for a long time. It can be done, but it's a hard road and you should prepare yourself for that. Just knowing how to bang together some js and push it to git is not enough to progress as an engineer. There's a reason why computer science exists, and there's a lot of stuff there that you'll need to learn if you want to succeed.

If you've successfully completed a bootcamp, then first of all congratulations, it's not an easy thing to do. But second, once you get that job you should make sure you keep learning. Ideally, find a state or community college near you and start taking classes in the CS department. Start with the basic Data Structures and Algorithms course - what you got in your bootcamp is only the tip of a huge iceberg, and you'll need to solidify your knowledge. From there, there's lots to choose from, and what you need will depend on what you've done so far, so seek guidance and make the best decisions you can, but keep studying.
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#5 macosxnerd101   User is offline

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Re: Degree required ?

Posted 29 April 2020 - 09:49 PM

I second the excellent advice given above that you need to work on growing your skills and gaining experience, even with just personal projects.

I also agree with Jon's recommendations.

The core CS skills that are necessary can be gained in an Intro to Programming course, Data Structures I course, and Discrete Math course. The first two courses are good for developing programming and software engineering skills, as well as familiarity with key data structures and analyzing basic algorithms. The Discrete Math course will teach you to think more precisely. (Speaking as someone that teaches CS students, the Math courses actually do a better job of teaching folks to think precisely.)

I imagine that the tuition for an Intro class at a community college is likely comparable to a bootcamp. Having a semester to absorb the content is honestly better for learning and understanding, rather than a three week compressed course.
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